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Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.

Dang, Junhua LU ; Xiao, Shanshan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yumeng and Mao, Lihua (2016) In International Journal of Psychophysiology 99. p.121-124
Abstract
Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch... (More)
Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Psychophysiology
volume
99
pages
121 - 124
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:26620929
  • wos:000369193800016
  • scopus:84953360336
ISSN
0167-8760
DOI
10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.11.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6b32402b-f61e-4810-ad1e-7291007a0a6c (old id 8506040)
date added to LUP
2016-01-08 12:56:09
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:07:43
@article{6b32402b-f61e-4810-ad1e-7291007a0a6c,
  abstract     = {Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching.},
  author       = {Dang, Junhua and Xiao, Shanshan and Liu, Ying and Jiang, Yumeng and Mao, Lihua},
  issn         = {0167-8760},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {121--124},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Psychophysiology},
  title        = {Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.11.013},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2016},
}