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Risk of subsequent gliomas and meningiomas among 69,460 5-year survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer in Europe : the PanCareSurFup study

Heymer, Emma J. ; Hawkins, Michael M. ; Winter, David L. ; Teepen, Jop C. ; Sunguc, Ceren ; Ronckers, Cécile M. ; Allodji, Rodrigue S. ; Alessi, Daniela ; Sugden, Elaine and Belle, Fabiën N. , et al. (2024) In British Journal of Cancer
Abstract

Background: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of subsequent gliomas and meningiomas, but the risks beyond age 40 years are uncertain. We quantified these risks in the largest ever cohort. Methods: Using data from 69,460 5-year childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed 1940–2008), across Europe, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and cumulative incidence were calculated. Results: In total, 279 glioma and 761 meningioma were identified. CNS tumour (SIR: 16.2, 95% CI: 13.7, 19.2) and leukaemia (SIR: 11.2, 95% CI: 8.8, 14.2) survivors were at greatest risk of glioma. The SIR for CNS tumour survivors was still 4.3-fold after age 50 (95% CI: 1.9, 9.6), and for leukaemia survivors still 10.2-fold after age 40 (95% CI: 4.9, 21.4). Following... (More)

Background: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of subsequent gliomas and meningiomas, but the risks beyond age 40 years are uncertain. We quantified these risks in the largest ever cohort. Methods: Using data from 69,460 5-year childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed 1940–2008), across Europe, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and cumulative incidence were calculated. Results: In total, 279 glioma and 761 meningioma were identified. CNS tumour (SIR: 16.2, 95% CI: 13.7, 19.2) and leukaemia (SIR: 11.2, 95% CI: 8.8, 14.2) survivors were at greatest risk of glioma. The SIR for CNS tumour survivors was still 4.3-fold after age 50 (95% CI: 1.9, 9.6), and for leukaemia survivors still 10.2-fold after age 40 (95% CI: 4.9, 21.4). Following cranial radiotherapy (CRT), the cumulative incidence of a glioma in CNS tumour survivors was 2.7%, 3.7% and 5.0% by ages 40, 50 and 60, respectively, whilst for leukaemia this was 1.2% and 1.7% by ages 40 and 50. The cumulative incidence of a meningioma after CRT in CNS tumour survivors doubled from 5.9% to 12.5% between ages 40 and 60, and in leukaemia survivors increased from 5.8% to 10.2% between ages 40 and 50. Discussion: Clinicians following up survivors should be aware that the substantial risks of meningioma and glioma following CRT are sustained beyond age 40 and be vigilant for symptoms.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
British Journal of Cancer
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85182705638
  • pmid:38243010
ISSN
0007-0920
DOI
10.1038/s41416-024-02577-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
87322128-6969-4e7b-8cb5-7e49bf0c6b92
date added to LUP
2024-02-16 13:35:34
date last changed
2024-04-17 07:19:43
@article{87322128-6969-4e7b-8cb5-7e49bf0c6b92,
  abstract     = {{<p>Background: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of subsequent gliomas and meningiomas, but the risks beyond age 40 years are uncertain. We quantified these risks in the largest ever cohort. Methods: Using data from 69,460 5-year childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed 1940–2008), across Europe, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and cumulative incidence were calculated. Results: In total, 279 glioma and 761 meningioma were identified. CNS tumour (SIR: 16.2, 95% CI: 13.7, 19.2) and leukaemia (SIR: 11.2, 95% CI: 8.8, 14.2) survivors were at greatest risk of glioma. The SIR for CNS tumour survivors was still 4.3-fold after age 50 (95% CI: 1.9, 9.6), and for leukaemia survivors still 10.2-fold after age 40 (95% CI: 4.9, 21.4). Following cranial radiotherapy (CRT), the cumulative incidence of a glioma in CNS tumour survivors was 2.7%, 3.7% and 5.0% by ages 40, 50 and 60, respectively, whilst for leukaemia this was 1.2% and 1.7% by ages 40 and 50. The cumulative incidence of a meningioma after CRT in CNS tumour survivors doubled from 5.9% to 12.5% between ages 40 and 60, and in leukaemia survivors increased from 5.8% to 10.2% between ages 40 and 50. Discussion: Clinicians following up survivors should be aware that the substantial risks of meningioma and glioma following CRT are sustained beyond age 40 and be vigilant for symptoms.</p>}},
  author       = {{Heymer, Emma J. and Hawkins, Michael M. and Winter, David L. and Teepen, Jop C. and Sunguc, Ceren and Ronckers, Cécile M. and Allodji, Rodrigue S. and Alessi, Daniela and Sugden, Elaine and Belle, Fabiën N. and Bagnasco, Francesca and Byrne, Julianne and Bárdi, Edit and Garwicz, Stanislaw and Grabow, Desiree and Jankovic, Momcilo and Kaatsch, Peter and Kaiser, Melanie and Michel, Gisela and Schindera, Christina and Haddy, Nadia and Journy, Neige and Česen Mazić, Maja and Skinner, Roderick and Kok, Judith L. and Gunnes, Maria W. and Wiebe, Thomas and Sacerdote, Carlotta and Maule, Milena M. and Terenziani, Monica and Jakab, Zsuzsanna and Winther, Jeanette F. and Lähteenmäki, Päivi M. and Zadravec Zaletel, Lorna and Haupt, Riccardo and Kuehni, Claudia E. and Kremer, Leontien C. and de Vathaire, Florent and Hjorth, Lars and Reulen, Raoul C.}},
  issn         = {{0007-0920}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  publisher    = {{Nature Publishing Group}},
  series       = {{British Journal of Cancer}},
  title        = {{Risk of subsequent gliomas and meningiomas among 69,460 5-year survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer in Europe : the PanCareSurFup study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-024-02577-y}},
  doi          = {{10.1038/s41416-024-02577-y}},
  year         = {{2024}},
}