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Impact of pain characteristics and fear-avoidance beliefs on physical activity levels among older adults with chronic pain: a population-based, longitudinal study.

Larsson, Caroline LU ; Ekvall-Hansson, Eva LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Jakobsson, Ulf LU (2016) In BMC Geriatrics 16(1).
Abstract
BACKGROUND:



To explore the level of physical activity in a population based sample of older adults; to analyze the influence of pain characteristics and fear-avoidance beliefs as predictors of physical activity among older adults reporting chronic pain.

METHODS:



Demographics, pain characteristics (duration, intensity), physical activity, kinesiophobia (excessive fear of movement/(re) injury), self-efficacy and self-rated health were measured with questionnaires at baseline and 12-months later. Logistic regression analyses were done to identify associations at baseline and predictors of physical activity 12-months later during follow-up.

RESULTS:



Of the 1141 older... (More)
BACKGROUND:



To explore the level of physical activity in a population based sample of older adults; to analyze the influence of pain characteristics and fear-avoidance beliefs as predictors of physical activity among older adults reporting chronic pain.

METHODS:



Demographics, pain characteristics (duration, intensity), physical activity, kinesiophobia (excessive fear of movement/(re) injury), self-efficacy and self-rated health were measured with questionnaires at baseline and 12-months later. Logistic regression analyses were done to identify associations at baseline and predictors of physical activity 12-months later during follow-up.

RESULTS:



Of the 1141 older adults (mean age 74.4 range 65-103 years, 53.5 % women) included in the study, 31.1 % of those with chronic pain were sufficiently active (scoring ≥ 4 on Grimby's physical activity scale) compared to 56.9 % of those without chronic pain. Lower age (OR = 0.93, 95 % CI = 0.88-0.99), low kinesiophobia OR = 0.95, 95 % CI = 0.91-0.99), and higher activity level at baseline (OR = 10.0, 95 % CI = 4.98-20.67) significantly predicted higher levels of physical activity in individuals with chronic pain.

CONCLUSION:



The level of physical activity was significantly lower among those with chronic pain and was significantly associated with kinesiophobia. Our findings suggest that fear- avoidance believes plays a more important role in predicting future physical activity levels than pain characteristics. Thus our findings are important to consider when aiming to increase physical activity in older adults that have chronic pain. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Geriatrics
volume
16
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • pmid:26912216
  • scopus:84958961165
  • wos:000370786600001
ISSN
1471-2318
DOI
10.1186/s12877-016-0224-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5a1a1627-56d4-46c6-9a78-8b9ba82cebd8 (old id 8821723)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26912216?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-02 13:39:36
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:08:06
@article{5a1a1627-56d4-46c6-9a78-8b9ba82cebd8,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
To explore the level of physical activity in a population based sample of older adults; to analyze the influence of pain characteristics and fear-avoidance beliefs as predictors of physical activity among older adults reporting chronic pain.<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Demographics, pain characteristics (duration, intensity), physical activity, kinesiophobia (excessive fear of movement/(re) injury), self-efficacy and self-rated health were measured with questionnaires at baseline and 12-months later. Logistic regression analyses were done to identify associations at baseline and predictors of physical activity 12-months later during follow-up.<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Of the 1141 older adults (mean age 74.4 range 65-103 years, 53.5 % women) included in the study, 31.1 % of those with chronic pain were sufficiently active (scoring ≥ 4 on Grimby's physical activity scale) compared to 56.9 % of those without chronic pain. Lower age (OR = 0.93, 95 % CI = 0.88-0.99), low kinesiophobia OR = 0.95, 95 % CI = 0.91-0.99), and higher activity level at baseline (OR = 10.0, 95 % CI = 4.98-20.67) significantly predicted higher levels of physical activity in individuals with chronic pain.<br/><br>
CONCLUSION:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The level of physical activity was significantly lower among those with chronic pain and was significantly associated with kinesiophobia. Our findings suggest that fear- avoidance believes plays a more important role in predicting future physical activity levels than pain characteristics. Thus our findings are important to consider when aiming to increase physical activity in older adults that have chronic pain.},
  articleno    = {50},
  author       = {Larsson, Caroline and Ekvall-Hansson, Eva and Sundquist, Kristina and Jakobsson, Ulf},
  issn         = {1471-2318},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Geriatrics},
  title        = {Impact of pain characteristics and fear-avoidance beliefs on physical activity levels among older adults with chronic pain: a population-based, longitudinal study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-016-0224-3},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}