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Increasing wrist fracture rates in children may have major implications for future adult fracture burden.

Jerrhag, Daniel LU ; Englund, Martin LU ; Petersson, Ingmar; Lempesis, Vasileios LU ; Landin, Lennart LU ; Karlsson, Magnus K LU and Rosengren, Björn LU (2016) In Acta Orthopaedica p.1-5
Abstract
Background and purpose - Childhood fractures are associated with lower peak bone mass (a determinant of osteoporosis in old age) and higher adult fracture risk. By examining time trends in childhood fracture epidemiology, it may be possible to estimate the vector of fragility fracture risk in the future. Patients and methods - By using official inpatient and outpatient data from the county of Skåne in Sweden, 1999-2010, we ascertained distal forearm fractures in children aged ≤ 16 years and estimated overall and age- and sex-specific rates and time trends (over 2.8 million patient years) and compared the results to earlier estimations in the same region from 1950 onwards. Results - During the period 1999-2010, the distal forearm fracture... (More)
Background and purpose - Childhood fractures are associated with lower peak bone mass (a determinant of osteoporosis in old age) and higher adult fracture risk. By examining time trends in childhood fracture epidemiology, it may be possible to estimate the vector of fragility fracture risk in the future. Patients and methods - By using official inpatient and outpatient data from the county of Skåne in Sweden, 1999-2010, we ascertained distal forearm fractures in children aged ≤ 16 years and estimated overall and age- and sex-specific rates and time trends (over 2.8 million patient years) and compared the results to earlier estimations in the same region from 1950 onwards. Results - During the period 1999-2010, the distal forearm fracture rate was 634 per 10(5) patient years (750 in boys and 512 in girls). This was 50% higher than in the 1950s with a different age-rate distribution (p < 0.001) that was most evident during puberty. Also, within the period 1999-2010, there were increasing fracture rates per 10(5) and year (boys +2.0% (95% CI: 1.5-2.6), girls +2.4% (95% CI: 1.7-3.1)). Interpretation - The distal forearm fracture rate in children is currently 50% higher than in the 1950s, and it still appears to be increasing. If this higher fracture risk follows the children into old age, numbers of fragility fractures may increase sharply-as an upturn in life expectancy has also been predicted. The origin of the increase remains unknown, but it may be associated with a more sedentary lifestyle or with changes in risk behavior. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Orthopaedica
issue
Feb 24
pages
1 - 5
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:26905618
  • scopus:84959038933
  • wos:000377098700016
ISSN
1745-3682
DOI
10.3109/17453674.2016.1152855
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
de7e4623-2f4a-457b-aa92-88f9cd99b14b (old id 8821921)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26905618?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-02 15:22:54
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:05:51
@article{de7e4623-2f4a-457b-aa92-88f9cd99b14b,
  abstract     = {Background and purpose - Childhood fractures are associated with lower peak bone mass (a determinant of osteoporosis in old age) and higher adult fracture risk. By examining time trends in childhood fracture epidemiology, it may be possible to estimate the vector of fragility fracture risk in the future. Patients and methods - By using official inpatient and outpatient data from the county of Skåne in Sweden, 1999-2010, we ascertained distal forearm fractures in children aged ≤ 16 years and estimated overall and age- and sex-specific rates and time trends (over 2.8 million patient years) and compared the results to earlier estimations in the same region from 1950 onwards. Results - During the period 1999-2010, the distal forearm fracture rate was 634 per 10(5) patient years (750 in boys and 512 in girls). This was 50% higher than in the 1950s with a different age-rate distribution (p &lt; 0.001) that was most evident during puberty. Also, within the period 1999-2010, there were increasing fracture rates per 10(5) and year (boys +2.0% (95% CI: 1.5-2.6), girls +2.4% (95% CI: 1.7-3.1)). Interpretation - The distal forearm fracture rate in children is currently 50% higher than in the 1950s, and it still appears to be increasing. If this higher fracture risk follows the children into old age, numbers of fragility fractures may increase sharply-as an upturn in life expectancy has also been predicted. The origin of the increase remains unknown, but it may be associated with a more sedentary lifestyle or with changes in risk behavior.},
  author       = {Jerrhag, Daniel and Englund, Martin and Petersson, Ingmar and Lempesis, Vasileios and Landin, Lennart and Karlsson, Magnus K and Rosengren, Björn},
  issn         = {1745-3682},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Feb 24},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {Increasing wrist fracture rates in children may have major implications for future adult fracture burden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17453674.2016.1152855},
  year         = {2016},
}