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Apparent exchange rate for breast cancer characterization.

Lasič, Samo; Oredsson, Stina LU ; Partridge, Savannah C; Saal, Lao LU ; Topgaard, Daniel LU ; Nilsson, Markus LU and Bryskhe, Karin LU (2016) In NMR in Biomedicine 29(5). p.631-639
Abstract
Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments... (More)
Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments on several breast epithelial cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we performed the first in vivo FEXI measurement of water exchange in human breast. In cell suspensions, pulsed gradient spin-echo experiments with large b values and variable pulse duration allow the characterization of the intracellular compartment, whereas FEXSY provides a quantification of AXR. These experiments are very sensitive to the physiological state of cells and can be used to establish reliable protocols for the culture and harvesting of cells. Our results suggest that different breast cancer subtypes can be distinguished on the basis of their AXR values in cell suspensions. Time-resolved measurements allow the monitoring of the physiological state of cells in suspensions over the time-scale of hours, and reveal an abrupt disintegration of the intracellular compartment. In vivo, exchange can be detected in a tumor, whereas, in normal tissue, the exchange rate is outside the range experimentally accessible for FEXI. At present, low signal-to-noise ratio and limited scan time allows the quantification of AXR only in a region of interest of relatively large tumors. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
NMR in Biomedicine
volume
29
issue
5
pages
631 - 639
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:26929050
  • scopus:84959305817
  • wos:000374495900011
ISSN
0952-3480
DOI
10.1002/nbm.3504
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25d05935-6153-4b29-8313-fc39cd8d8706 (old id 8856746)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26929050?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-15 10:32:11
date last changed
2017-04-26 14:49:18
@article{25d05935-6153-4b29-8313-fc39cd8d8706,
  abstract     = {Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments on several breast epithelial cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we performed the first in vivo FEXI measurement of water exchange in human breast. In cell suspensions, pulsed gradient spin-echo experiments with large b values and variable pulse duration allow the characterization of the intracellular compartment, whereas FEXSY provides a quantification of AXR. These experiments are very sensitive to the physiological state of cells and can be used to establish reliable protocols for the culture and harvesting of cells. Our results suggest that different breast cancer subtypes can be distinguished on the basis of their AXR values in cell suspensions. Time-resolved measurements allow the monitoring of the physiological state of cells in suspensions over the time-scale of hours, and reveal an abrupt disintegration of the intracellular compartment. In vivo, exchange can be detected in a tumor, whereas, in normal tissue, the exchange rate is outside the range experimentally accessible for FEXI. At present, low signal-to-noise ratio and limited scan time allows the quantification of AXR only in a region of interest of relatively large tumors. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.},
  author       = {Lasič, Samo and Oredsson, Stina and Partridge, Savannah C and Saal, Lao and Topgaard, Daniel and Nilsson, Markus and Bryskhe, Karin},
  issn         = {0952-3480},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {631--639},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {NMR in Biomedicine},
  title        = {Apparent exchange rate for breast cancer characterization.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3504},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2016},
}