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When the Butcher Calls the Hunter Foul, and the Muddied Politics which Follow: Speciesism and the EU Opposition to the Wolf Hunt

Boyer, Kurtis LU (2016) In Contemporary Justice Review 19(2). p.201-209
Abstract
Rarely does the death of animals cause conflict between governments. However, the killing of some animals, such as seals, wolves, and other exotic wildlife, can cause heated conflict over whether the act of killing is itself justifiable.This paper provides an overview of a recent disagreement along these lines – between the EU and Sweden over the management of wolves. It juxtaposes the recent politicalization of the wolf hunt with an overview of two very different moral frameworks that humans use to conceive of the value of animals. This paper argues that these two moral frameworks share in employing a human-centrism which consequently restricts how the issue of justice can be introduced into policy discussions regarding the treatment of... (More)
Rarely does the death of animals cause conflict between governments. However, the killing of some animals, such as seals, wolves, and other exotic wildlife, can cause heated conflict over whether the act of killing is itself justifiable.This paper provides an overview of a recent disagreement along these lines – between the EU and Sweden over the management of wolves. It juxtaposes the recent politicalization of the wolf hunt with an overview of two very different moral frameworks that humans use to conceive of the value of animals. This paper argues that these two moral frameworks share in employing a human-centrism which consequently restricts how the issue of justice can be introduced into policy discussions regarding the treatment of animals. However, the primary assertion made here is that while these two frameworks are constituted by anthropocentrism, they represent two different incarnations of anthropocentrism which as is illustrated by the debate surrounding the justifiability of the wolf hunt, provide very different points to which questions of justice are truncated or introduced. Therefore the assertion made in this paper is that the conflict between the EU and Sweden, over the justifiability of the wolf hunt stems from competing articulations of anthropocentrism. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
speciesism, EU, Sweden, wolf
in
Contemporary Justice Review
volume
19
issue
2
pages
201 - 209
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84963613857
ISSN
1028-2580
DOI
10.1080/10282580.2016.1168255
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a3dca46c-804c-41c7-8d84-48543e3755fa (old id 8863284)
date added to LUP
2016-03-18 15:13:04
date last changed
2017-06-05 13:17:23
@article{a3dca46c-804c-41c7-8d84-48543e3755fa,
  abstract     = {Rarely does the death of animals cause conflict between governments. However, the killing of some animals, such as seals, wolves, and other exotic wildlife, can cause heated conflict over whether the act of killing is itself justifiable.This paper provides an overview of a recent disagreement along these lines – between the EU and Sweden over the management of wolves. It juxtaposes the recent politicalization of the wolf hunt with an overview of two very different moral frameworks that humans use to conceive of the value of animals. This paper argues that these two moral frameworks share in employing a human-centrism which consequently restricts how the issue of justice can be introduced into policy discussions regarding the treatment of animals. However, the primary assertion made here is that while these two frameworks are constituted by anthropocentrism, they represent two different incarnations of anthropocentrism which as is illustrated by the debate surrounding the justifiability of the wolf hunt, provide very different points to which questions of justice are truncated or introduced. Therefore the assertion made in this paper is that the conflict between the EU and Sweden, over the justifiability of the wolf hunt stems from competing articulations of anthropocentrism.},
  author       = {Boyer, Kurtis},
  issn         = {1028-2580},
  keyword      = {speciesism,EU,Sweden,wolf},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {201--209},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Contemporary Justice Review},
  title        = {When the Butcher Calls the Hunter Foul, and the Muddied Politics which Follow: Speciesism and the EU Opposition to the Wolf Hunt},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10282580.2016.1168255},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2016},
}