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The Relation of Hypnotizability and Dissociation to Everyday Mentation: An Experience-Sampling Study

Cardeña, Etzel LU and Marcusson-Clavertz, David LU (2016) In Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice 3(1). p.61-76
Abstract
Research has found that individuals varying in hypnotizability and dissociation respond

differently to questionnaires and procedures geared to affect their state of consciousness,

but their stream of consciousness in everyday life has not been investigated. We

evaluated the everyday mentation of students (N 46) in a 2 (High vs. Low

Hypnotizability) 2 (High vs. Low Dissociative) design through experience sampling

with personal digital assistants (PDAs). The PDAs prompted volunteers randomly 8

times per day during 5 days and included questions about attention, type of mental

activity, and mood, among others, which resulted in 5 factors: focus/absorption,

daydreaming,... (More)
Research has found that individuals varying in hypnotizability and dissociation respond

differently to questionnaires and procedures geared to affect their state of consciousness,

but their stream of consciousness in everyday life has not been investigated. We

evaluated the everyday mentation of students (N 46) in a 2 (High vs. Low

Hypnotizability) 2 (High vs. Low Dissociative) design through experience sampling

with personal digital assistants (PDAs). The PDAs prompted volunteers randomly 8

times per day during 5 days and included questions about attention, type of mental

activity, and mood, among others, which resulted in 5 factors: focus/absorption,

daydreaming, negative affect, control/awareness, and detachment. High control/

awareness correlated with high focus/absorption, low negative affect, and low detachment.

Detachment correlated also with daydreaming. As predicted, high dissociatives

reported less control but more detachment and negative affect than low dissociatives.

High hypnotizables (Highs) did not report more focus/absorption than low hypnotizables

(Lows) but endorsed more daydreaming and negative affect. Highs reported more

thoughts than Lows, and Lows reported more sensory impressions than Highs. Hypnotizability

and dissociation also interacted: Low dissociatives/Lows reported less

daydreaming than the others, and high dissociatives/Lows experienced less control

than the other 3 groups combined. Participants reported less control/awareness during

daydreaming, with high dissociatives/Highs showing a larger decrement than the others.

Most mentations referred to thoughts or sensory impressions; the former were

characterized by more negative affect than the latter. In general, individuals felt

more dysphoric when (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
daydreaming, experience sampling, hypnotizability, dissociation, mind wandering
in
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice
volume
3
issue
1
pages
61 - 76
publisher
American Psychological Association (APA)
ISSN
2326-5523
DOI
10.1037/cns0000080
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2a9ce390-bed4-4526-92b8-40d659da1ca0 (old id 8866876)
date added to LUP
2016-03-23 13:29:57
date last changed
2016-11-10 13:35:07
@article{2a9ce390-bed4-4526-92b8-40d659da1ca0,
  abstract     = {Research has found that individuals varying in hypnotizability and dissociation respond<br/><br>
differently to questionnaires and procedures geared to affect their state of consciousness,<br/><br>
but their stream of consciousness in everyday life has not been investigated. We<br/><br>
evaluated the everyday mentation of students (N 46) in a 2 (High vs. Low<br/><br>
Hypnotizability) 2 (High vs. Low Dissociative) design through experience sampling<br/><br>
with personal digital assistants (PDAs). The PDAs prompted volunteers randomly 8<br/><br>
times per day during 5 days and included questions about attention, type of mental<br/><br>
activity, and mood, among others, which resulted in 5 factors: focus/absorption,<br/><br>
daydreaming, negative affect, control/awareness, and detachment. High control/<br/><br>
awareness correlated with high focus/absorption, low negative affect, and low detachment.<br/><br>
Detachment correlated also with daydreaming. As predicted, high dissociatives<br/><br>
reported less control but more detachment and negative affect than low dissociatives.<br/><br>
High hypnotizables (Highs) did not report more focus/absorption than low hypnotizables<br/><br>
(Lows) but endorsed more daydreaming and negative affect. Highs reported more<br/><br>
thoughts than Lows, and Lows reported more sensory impressions than Highs. Hypnotizability<br/><br>
and dissociation also interacted: Low dissociatives/Lows reported less<br/><br>
daydreaming than the others, and high dissociatives/Lows experienced less control<br/><br>
than the other 3 groups combined. Participants reported less control/awareness during<br/><br>
daydreaming, with high dissociatives/Highs showing a larger decrement than the others.<br/><br>
Most mentations referred to thoughts or sensory impressions; the former were<br/><br>
characterized by more negative affect than the latter. In general, individuals felt<br/><br>
more dysphoric when},
  author       = {Cardeña, Etzel and Marcusson-Clavertz, David},
  issn         = {2326-5523},
  keyword      = {daydreaming,experience sampling,hypnotizability,dissociation,mind wandering},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {61--76},
  publisher    = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
  series       = {Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice},
  title        = {The Relation of Hypnotizability and Dissociation to Everyday Mentation: An Experience-Sampling Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cns0000080},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2016},
}