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A comparison of the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for persons with severe mental illness: Small congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings

Brunt, D and Hansson, Lars LU (2002) In International Journal of Social Psychiatry 48(4). p.243-252
Abstract
Background: Legislation was passed in Sweden to stimulate the development of different housing solutions for persons suffering from severe mental illness. Among these solutions are small congregate residences built in the community to provide suitable housing and support for those not able or willing to live independently. Aims: The general aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for the persons with severe mental illness - congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings. A specific aim was to see if the former provided higher levels of autonomy than the latter. Methods: In this cross-sectional study the real version of the Community Oriented Program Environmental... (More)
Background: Legislation was passed in Sweden to stimulate the development of different housing solutions for persons suffering from severe mental illness. Among these solutions are small congregate residences built in the community to provide suitable housing and support for those not able or willing to live independently. Aims: The general aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for the persons with severe mental illness - congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings. A specific aim was to see if the former provided higher levels of autonomy than the latter. Methods: In this cross-sectional study the real version of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) was administered to residents, patients and staff members. Results: The study showed that the psychosocial environment differs between the two types of settings. Residents and staff in small congregate residences rated higher levels of Autonomy and lower levels of Practical Orientation, Anger and Aggression and Order and Organisation than patients and staff in inpatient settings. Conclusions: The psychosocial environment profiles for psychiatric settings in different phases of the care process may vary in terms of the aforementioned subscales. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Social Psychiatry
volume
48
issue
4
pages
243 - 252
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000180512500001
  • pmid:12553405
  • scopus:0036940761
ISSN
1741-2854
DOI
10.1177/002076402128783280
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
38baa2c0-c3e6-472c-ac29-94203a8428f5 (old id 891339)
date added to LUP
2008-01-17 12:12:50
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:09:24
@article{38baa2c0-c3e6-472c-ac29-94203a8428f5,
  abstract     = {Background: Legislation was passed in Sweden to stimulate the development of different housing solutions for persons suffering from severe mental illness. Among these solutions are small congregate residences built in the community to provide suitable housing and support for those not able or willing to live independently. Aims: The general aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for the persons with severe mental illness - congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings. A specific aim was to see if the former provided higher levels of autonomy than the latter. Methods: In this cross-sectional study the real version of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) was administered to residents, patients and staff members. Results: The study showed that the psychosocial environment differs between the two types of settings. Residents and staff in small congregate residences rated higher levels of Autonomy and lower levels of Practical Orientation, Anger and Aggression and Order and Organisation than patients and staff in inpatient settings. Conclusions: The psychosocial environment profiles for psychiatric settings in different phases of the care process may vary in terms of the aforementioned subscales.},
  author       = {Brunt, D and Hansson, Lars},
  issn         = {1741-2854},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {243--252},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {International Journal of Social Psychiatry},
  title        = {A comparison of the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for persons with severe mental illness: Small congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/002076402128783280},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2002},
}