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Parietal lobe: Activation in rapid, automatized naming by adults

Wiig, EH; Nielsen, NP; Minthon, Lennart LU and Garrett, GE (2002) In Perceptual and Motor Skills 94(3). p.1230-1244
Abstract
Three automatic naming tasks (Wiig & Nielsen, 1999) were administered to 60 normal functioning adults. The mean time required for naming 40 single-dimension (colors, forms, numbers, and letters) and 40 dual dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, and color letter combinations) were compared in young (17-38 yr.) and older (40-68 yr.) men and women. Analysis of variance for the combined groups indicated significant naming-time differences for age but not for sex. There were no significant interaction effects. For men there was a significant naming time difference between age groups for forms, and for women for colors and forms. The sex-specific analyses indicated no significant differences in naming time based on age groups for... (More)
Three automatic naming tasks (Wiig & Nielsen, 1999) were administered to 60 normal functioning adults. The mean time required for naming 40 single-dimension (colors, forms, numbers, and letters) and 40 dual dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, and color letter combinations) were compared in young (17-38 yr.) and older (40-68 yr.) men and women. Analysis of variance for the combined groups indicated significant naming-time differences for age but not for sex. There were no significant interaction effects. For men there was a significant naming time difference between age groups for forms, and for women for colors and forms. The sex-specific analyses indicated no significant differences in naming time based on age groups for color-form, color-number, or color letter combinations. In a second study of adult subjects (n =14), functional brain activity was measured with regional cerebral blood flow during the performance of the color, form, and color form naming tasks. One subject was repeatedly measured during the performance of each task, whereas 13 subject, were measured during the performance of color form naming. In comparison to normal reference values for rest and FAS verbal flaency, blood-flow measurements showed a consistent parietal-lobe activation during form and color form naming, but only a slight activation during color naming. During all naming tasks, a significant frontal and frontotemporal flow decrease was seen in comparison to both rest and verbal fluency reference value. This functional brain activation pattern of a parietal increase and a frontotemporal decrease was consistently confirmed across subjects during the color-form naming task. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Perceptual and Motor Skills
volume
94
issue
3
pages
1230 - 1244
publisher
PERCEPTUAL MOTOR SKILLS
external identifiers
  • wos:000177411400021
  • pmid:12186245
  • scopus:0036593841
ISSN
0031-5125
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
223dc9b2-eac4-4e7e-8fe7-3bfcc64082c3 (old id 892766)
date added to LUP
2008-01-23 11:35:35
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:58:57
@article{223dc9b2-eac4-4e7e-8fe7-3bfcc64082c3,
  abstract     = {Three automatic naming tasks (Wiig & Nielsen, 1999) were administered to 60 normal functioning adults. The mean time required for naming 40 single-dimension (colors, forms, numbers, and letters) and 40 dual dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, and color letter combinations) were compared in young (17-38 yr.) and older (40-68 yr.) men and women. Analysis of variance for the combined groups indicated significant naming-time differences for age but not for sex. There were no significant interaction effects. For men there was a significant naming time difference between age groups for forms, and for women for colors and forms. The sex-specific analyses indicated no significant differences in naming time based on age groups for color-form, color-number, or color letter combinations. In a second study of adult subjects (n =14), functional brain activity was measured with regional cerebral blood flow during the performance of the color, form, and color form naming tasks. One subject was repeatedly measured during the performance of each task, whereas 13 subject, were measured during the performance of color form naming. In comparison to normal reference values for rest and FAS verbal flaency, blood-flow measurements showed a consistent parietal-lobe activation during form and color form naming, but only a slight activation during color naming. During all naming tasks, a significant frontal and frontotemporal flow decrease was seen in comparison to both rest and verbal fluency reference value. This functional brain activation pattern of a parietal increase and a frontotemporal decrease was consistently confirmed across subjects during the color-form naming task.},
  author       = {Wiig, EH and Nielsen, NP and Minthon, Lennart and Garrett, GE},
  issn         = {0031-5125},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1230--1244},
  publisher    = {PERCEPTUAL MOTOR SKILLS},
  series       = {Perceptual and Motor Skills},
  title        = {Parietal lobe: Activation in rapid, automatized naming by adults},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2002},
}