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Systemic betamethasone accelerates functional recovery after a crush injury to rat sciatic nerve

Al-Bishri, A; Dahlin, Lars LU ; Sunzel, B and Rosenquist, J (2005) In Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 63(7). p.973-977
Abstract
Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of perioperatively systemically administered betamethasone on nerve recovery (within or outside a confined space) after induced nerve crush injury. Materials and Methods: The sciatic nerve of 40 adult Wistar rats was crushed. In half of the animals, the injured nerve was entrapped in a silicone tube to simulate the environment of a closed space, and in the other half the nerve was left to heal. Half of the rats in each group were treated with subcutaneous betamethasone (2 mg/kg body weight/day) during the first 24 hours, starting preoperatively, whereas the other half, the control animals, were given the same amount of physiological saline. All animals underwent preoperative and... (More)
Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of perioperatively systemically administered betamethasone on nerve recovery (within or outside a confined space) after induced nerve crush injury. Materials and Methods: The sciatic nerve of 40 adult Wistar rats was crushed. In half of the animals, the injured nerve was entrapped in a silicone tube to simulate the environment of a closed space, and in the other half the nerve was left to heal. Half of the rats in each group were treated with subcutaneous betamethasone (2 mg/kg body weight/day) during the first 24 hours, starting preoperatively, whereas the other half, the control animals, were given the same amount of physiological saline. All animals underwent preoperative and postoperative walking track analysis (toe spread [TS] and intermediate toe spread [ITS]) twice weekly for 6 weeks. Results: For nonconfined space groups, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=.052 for ITS and P =.315 for TS) during the first 2 weeks. Starting from the end of the second week, animals treated with betamethasone recovered more rapidly than did the controls (P <.001) and continued to do so until the end of the observation period. In the confined space groups, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups for ITS (P <.001) and for TS (P <.05) during the first 2 weeks. The difference continued at almost the same level of significance (P =.001) for ITS, whereas for TS, the difference disappeared after the second week. Conclusions: We conclude that short-term perioperative administration of betamethasone has a beneficial effect on the recovery of the injured rat sciatic nerve. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
volume
63
issue
7
pages
973 - 977
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000230233600015
  • pmid:16003625
  • scopus:21244479480
ISSN
0278-2391
DOI
10.1016/j.joms.2004.10.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6274e48c-5731-42d0-bc3d-fd16bc7d5e44 (old id 895140)
date added to LUP
2008-01-11 09:55:21
date last changed
2017-04-09 04:15:49
@article{6274e48c-5731-42d0-bc3d-fd16bc7d5e44,
  abstract     = {Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of perioperatively systemically administered betamethasone on nerve recovery (within or outside a confined space) after induced nerve crush injury. Materials and Methods: The sciatic nerve of 40 adult Wistar rats was crushed. In half of the animals, the injured nerve was entrapped in a silicone tube to simulate the environment of a closed space, and in the other half the nerve was left to heal. Half of the rats in each group were treated with subcutaneous betamethasone (2 mg/kg body weight/day) during the first 24 hours, starting preoperatively, whereas the other half, the control animals, were given the same amount of physiological saline. All animals underwent preoperative and postoperative walking track analysis (toe spread [TS] and intermediate toe spread [ITS]) twice weekly for 6 weeks. Results: For nonconfined space groups, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=.052 for ITS and P =.315 for TS) during the first 2 weeks. Starting from the end of the second week, animals treated with betamethasone recovered more rapidly than did the controls (P &lt;.001) and continued to do so until the end of the observation period. In the confined space groups, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups for ITS (P &lt;.001) and for TS (P &lt;.05) during the first 2 weeks. The difference continued at almost the same level of significance (P =.001) for ITS, whereas for TS, the difference disappeared after the second week. Conclusions: We conclude that short-term perioperative administration of betamethasone has a beneficial effect on the recovery of the injured rat sciatic nerve.},
  author       = {Al-Bishri, A and Dahlin, Lars and Sunzel, B and Rosenquist, J},
  issn         = {0278-2391},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {973--977},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery},
  title        = {Systemic betamethasone accelerates functional recovery after a crush injury to rat sciatic nerve},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2004.10.010},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2005},
}