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Virtual reality therapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social phobia: A preliminary controlled study

Klinger, E; Bouchard, S; Legeron, P; Roy, S; Lauer, F; Chemin, I and Nugues, Pierre LU (2005) In Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8(1). p.76-88
Abstract
Social phobia is one of the most frequent mental disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive behavior therapies (CBT). In this last case, graded exposure to feared social situations is one of the fundamental therapeutic ingredients. Virtual reality technologies are an interesting alternative to the standard exposure in social phobia, especially since studies have shown its usefulness for the fear of public speaking. This paper reports a preliminary study in which a virtual reality therapy (VRT), based on exposure to virtual environments, was used to treat social phobia. The sample consisted of 36 participants diagnosed with social phobia assigned to either VRT or a... (More)
Social phobia is one of the most frequent mental disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive behavior therapies (CBT). In this last case, graded exposure to feared social situations is one of the fundamental therapeutic ingredients. Virtual reality technologies are an interesting alternative to the standard exposure in social phobia, especially since studies have shown its usefulness for the fear of public speaking. This paper reports a preliminary study in which a virtual reality therapy (VRT), based on exposure to virtual environments, was used to treat social phobia. The sample consisted of 36 participants diagnosed with social phobia assigned to either VRT or a group-CBT ( control condition). The virtual environments used in the treatment recreate four situations dealing with social anxiety: performance, intimacy, scrutiny, and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors in order to reduce anxiety in the corresponding real situations. Both treatments lasted 12 weeks, and sessions were delivered according to a treatment manual. Results showed statistically and clinically significant improvement in both conditions. The effect-sizes comparing the efficacy of VRT to the control traditional group-CBT revealed that the differences between the two treatments are trivial. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cyberpsychology & Behavior
volume
8
issue
1
pages
76 - 88
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:15738695
  • wos:000227454100009
  • scopus:14644388092
ISSN
1094-9313
DOI
10.1089/cpb.2005.8.76
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12cd9458-fe34-489a-9d65-4bd8e99d4719 (old id 897183)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 13:06:01
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:53:50
@article{12cd9458-fe34-489a-9d65-4bd8e99d4719,
  abstract     = {Social phobia is one of the most frequent mental disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive behavior therapies (CBT). In this last case, graded exposure to feared social situations is one of the fundamental therapeutic ingredients. Virtual reality technologies are an interesting alternative to the standard exposure in social phobia, especially since studies have shown its usefulness for the fear of public speaking. This paper reports a preliminary study in which a virtual reality therapy (VRT), based on exposure to virtual environments, was used to treat social phobia. The sample consisted of 36 participants diagnosed with social phobia assigned to either VRT or a group-CBT ( control condition). The virtual environments used in the treatment recreate four situations dealing with social anxiety: performance, intimacy, scrutiny, and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors in order to reduce anxiety in the corresponding real situations. Both treatments lasted 12 weeks, and sessions were delivered according to a treatment manual. Results showed statistically and clinically significant improvement in both conditions. The effect-sizes comparing the efficacy of VRT to the control traditional group-CBT revealed that the differences between the two treatments are trivial.},
  author       = {Klinger, E and Bouchard, S and Legeron, P and Roy, S and Lauer, F and Chemin, I and Nugues, Pierre},
  issn         = {1094-9313},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {76--88},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Cyberpsychology & Behavior},
  title        = {Virtual reality therapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social phobia: A preliminary controlled study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2005.8.76},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2005},
}