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Familial thrombophilia and lifetime risk of venous thrombosis

Vossen, CY; Conard, J; Fontcuberta, J; Makris, M; Van Der Meer, FJM; Pabinger, I; Palareti, G; Preston, FE; Scharrer, I and Souto, JC, et al. (2004) In Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2(9). p.1526-1532
Abstract
Background. We started a large multicenter prospective follow-up study to provide reliable risk estimates of venous thrombosis in families with various thrombophilic defects. Objectives: This paper describes data collected at study entry on venous events experienced before study inclusion, i.e. the baseline data. Patients/methods: All individuals (probands, relatives) registered in nine European thrombosis centers with the factor (F)V Leiden mutation, a deficiency of antithrombin, protein C or protein S, or a combination of these defects, were enrolled between March 1994 and September 1997. As control individuals, partners, friends or acquaintances of the thrombophilic participants were included. Incidence and relative risk of objectively... (More)
Background. We started a large multicenter prospective follow-up study to provide reliable risk estimates of venous thrombosis in families with various thrombophilic defects. Objectives: This paper describes data collected at study entry on venous events experienced before study inclusion, i.e. the baseline data. Patients/methods: All individuals (probands, relatives) registered in nine European thrombosis centers with the factor (F)V Leiden mutation, a deficiency of antithrombin, protein C or protein S, or a combination of these defects, were enrolled between March 1994 and September 1997. As control individuals, partners, friends or acquaintances of the thrombophilic participants were included. Incidence and relative risk of objectively confirmed venous thrombotic events (VTEs) prior to entry were calculated for the relatives with thrombophilia and the controls. Results: Of the 846 relatives with thrombophilia (excluding probands), 139 (16%) had experienced a VTE with an incidence of 4.4 per 1000 person years. Of the controls, 15 of the 1212 (1%) controls had experienced a VTE with an incidence of 0.3 per 1000 person years. The risk of venous thrombosis associated with familial thrombophilia was 15.7 (95% CI 9.2-26.8) and remained similar after adjustment for regional and sex-effects (16.4; 95% CI 9.6-28.0). The highest incidence per 1000 person years was found in relatives with combined defects (8.4; 95% CI 5.6-12.2), and the lowest incidence was found in those with the FV Leiden mutation (1.5; 95% CI 0.8-2.6). Conclusions: Considerable differences in the lifetime risk of VTE were observed among individuals with different thrombophilia defects. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
venous thrombosis, genetic risk factors, thrombophilia
in
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis
volume
2
issue
9
pages
1526 - 1532
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000223759500005
  • pmid:15333025
  • scopus:19944433631
ISSN
1538-7933
DOI
10.1111/j.1538-7836.2004.00852.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
50c2e1f4-e1cd-4e16-a977-7c8f8ff81dfd (old id 898418)
date added to LUP
2008-01-18 14:46:02
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:41:48
@article{50c2e1f4-e1cd-4e16-a977-7c8f8ff81dfd,
  abstract     = {Background. We started a large multicenter prospective follow-up study to provide reliable risk estimates of venous thrombosis in families with various thrombophilic defects. Objectives: This paper describes data collected at study entry on venous events experienced before study inclusion, i.e. the baseline data. Patients/methods: All individuals (probands, relatives) registered in nine European thrombosis centers with the factor (F)V Leiden mutation, a deficiency of antithrombin, protein C or protein S, or a combination of these defects, were enrolled between March 1994 and September 1997. As control individuals, partners, friends or acquaintances of the thrombophilic participants were included. Incidence and relative risk of objectively confirmed venous thrombotic events (VTEs) prior to entry were calculated for the relatives with thrombophilia and the controls. Results: Of the 846 relatives with thrombophilia (excluding probands), 139 (16%) had experienced a VTE with an incidence of 4.4 per 1000 person years. Of the controls, 15 of the 1212 (1%) controls had experienced a VTE with an incidence of 0.3 per 1000 person years. The risk of venous thrombosis associated with familial thrombophilia was 15.7 (95% CI 9.2-26.8) and remained similar after adjustment for regional and sex-effects (16.4; 95% CI 9.6-28.0). The highest incidence per 1000 person years was found in relatives with combined defects (8.4; 95% CI 5.6-12.2), and the lowest incidence was found in those with the FV Leiden mutation (1.5; 95% CI 0.8-2.6). Conclusions: Considerable differences in the lifetime risk of VTE were observed among individuals with different thrombophilia defects.},
  author       = {Vossen, CY and Conard, J and Fontcuberta, J and Makris, M and Van Der Meer, FJM and Pabinger, I and Palareti, G and Preston, FE and Scharrer, I and Souto, JC and Svensson, Peter and Walker, ID and Rosendaal, FR},
  issn         = {1538-7933},
  keyword      = {venous thrombosis,genetic risk factors,thrombophilia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1526--1532},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis},
  title        = {Familial thrombophilia and lifetime risk of venous thrombosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-7836.2004.00852.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2004},
}