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Multiple rapid automatic naming measures of cognition: Normal performance and effects of aging

Jacobson, JM; Nielsen, NP; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Warkentin, S and Wiig, EH (2004) In Perceptual and Motor Skills 98(3). p.739-753
Abstract
Rapid automatic naming tasks are clinical tools for probing brain functions that underlie normal cognition. To compare performance for various stimuli in normal subjects and assess the effect of aging, we administered six single-dimension stimuli (color, form, number, letter, animal, and object) and five dual-dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, color-letter, color-animal, and color-object) to 144 normal volunteers who ranged in age from 15 to 85 years. Rapid automatic naming times for letters and numbers were significantly less than for forms, animals, and objects. Rapid automatic naming times for color-number and color-letter stimuli were significantly less than for color-form, color-animal, or color-object stimuli. Age... (More)
Rapid automatic naming tasks are clinical tools for probing brain functions that underlie normal cognition. To compare performance for various stimuli in normal subjects and assess the effect of aging, we administered six single-dimension stimuli (color, form, number, letter, animal, and object) and five dual-dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, color-letter, color-animal, and color-object) to 144 normal volunteers who ranged in age from 15 to 85 years. Rapid automatic naming times for letters and numbers were significantly less than for forms, animals, and objects. Rapid automatic naming times for color-number and color-letter stimuli were significantly less than for color-form, color-animal, or color-object stimuli. Age correlated significantly with rapid automatic naming time for each single-dimension stimulus and for color-form, color-number, color-animal, and color-object stimuli. Linear regression showed that rapid automatic naming times increased with age for aggregated color stimuli, aggregated single-dimension stimuli, and aggregated dual-dimension stimuli. This age effect persisted in subgroups less than 60 years of age and greater than 60 years of age. We conclude that normal performance time is dependent on the task, with letter and number stimuli eliciting most rapid responses, and that most rapid automatic naming times increase with age. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Perceptual and Motor Skills
volume
98
issue
3
pages
739 - 753
publisher
PERCEPTUAL MOTOR SKILLS
external identifiers
  • pmid:15209286
  • wos:000221627100001
  • scopus:4243200353
ISSN
0031-5125
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ad10645c-3c1e-4f91-af30-b83b1d8a1375 (old id 898977)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 18:00:08
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:42:51
@article{ad10645c-3c1e-4f91-af30-b83b1d8a1375,
  abstract     = {Rapid automatic naming tasks are clinical tools for probing brain functions that underlie normal cognition. To compare performance for various stimuli in normal subjects and assess the effect of aging, we administered six single-dimension stimuli (color, form, number, letter, animal, and object) and five dual-dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, color-letter, color-animal, and color-object) to 144 normal volunteers who ranged in age from 15 to 85 years. Rapid automatic naming times for letters and numbers were significantly less than for forms, animals, and objects. Rapid automatic naming times for color-number and color-letter stimuli were significantly less than for color-form, color-animal, or color-object stimuli. Age correlated significantly with rapid automatic naming time for each single-dimension stimulus and for color-form, color-number, color-animal, and color-object stimuli. Linear regression showed that rapid automatic naming times increased with age for aggregated color stimuli, aggregated single-dimension stimuli, and aggregated dual-dimension stimuli. This age effect persisted in subgroups less than 60 years of age and greater than 60 years of age. We conclude that normal performance time is dependent on the task, with letter and number stimuli eliciting most rapid responses, and that most rapid automatic naming times increase with age.},
  author       = {Jacobson, JM and Nielsen, NP and Minthon, Lennart and Warkentin, S and Wiig, EH},
  issn         = {0031-5125},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {739--753},
  publisher    = {PERCEPTUAL MOTOR SKILLS},
  series       = {Perceptual and Motor Skills},
  title        = {Multiple rapid automatic naming measures of cognition: Normal performance and effects of aging},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2004},
}