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A retrospective analysis of health care costs for bone fractures in women with early-stage breast carcinoma

Zhou, ZY; Redaelli, A; Johnell, Olof LU ; Willke, RJ and Massimini, G (2004) In Cancer 100(3). p.507-517
Abstract
BACKGROUND. in this retrospective data base study, the authors sought to estimate direct costs for bone fractures in women age 65 years with early-stage breast carcinoma and to compare those costs with treatment costs for bone fractures in older women without early-stage breast carcinoma. METHODS. Direct costs for bone fractures in patients with early-stage breast carcinoma, which consist of excess treatment costs for bone fracture and excess costs of long-term care for bone fracture, were evaluated by using the 1997-1998 Standard Analytical File. The statistical significance of the difference in inpatient costs, medical treatment costs, and long-term care admission rates were determined with the t test and the Fisher chi-square test,... (More)
BACKGROUND. in this retrospective data base study, the authors sought to estimate direct costs for bone fractures in women age 65 years with early-stage breast carcinoma and to compare those costs with treatment costs for bone fractures in older women without early-stage breast carcinoma. METHODS. Direct costs for bone fractures in patients with early-stage breast carcinoma, which consist of excess treatment costs for bone fracture and excess costs of long-term care for bone fracture, were evaluated by using the 1997-1998 Standard Analytical File. The statistical significance of the difference in inpatient costs, medical treatment costs, and long-term care admission rates were determined with the t test and the Fisher chi-square test, respectively. RESULTS. For older women with early-stage breast carcinoma, the direct costs for bone fracture were estimated at $45,579, and 57% of those costs came from treating the bone fracture (32% came from inpatient hospital costs, and 25% came from noninpatient hospital costs), 25% came from other excess treatment costs, and 18% came from excess long-term care costs. The women who had early-stage breast carcinoma and sustained bone fracture did not differ significantly from the women without early-stage breast carcinoma who sustained a bone fracture. CONCLUSIONS. Bone fracture was associated with high direct costs in older women with early-stage breast carcinoma. Additional research should include appropriate, incidence-based studies to investigate the potential benefit of an intervention for preventing bone fracture in this increasingly large patient population. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bone fracture, breast carcinoma, cost consequence analysis, excess, excess long term care cost, treatment cost
in
Cancer
volume
100
issue
3
pages
507 - 517
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000188611400009
  • pmid:14745866
  • scopus:1642453605
ISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/cncr.11917
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
96583f6f-2ee9-4094-aada-f974c7076d52 (old id 899419)
date added to LUP
2008-01-18 15:08:27
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:43:58
@article{96583f6f-2ee9-4094-aada-f974c7076d52,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND. in this retrospective data base study, the authors sought to estimate direct costs for bone fractures in women age 65 years with early-stage breast carcinoma and to compare those costs with treatment costs for bone fractures in older women without early-stage breast carcinoma. METHODS. Direct costs for bone fractures in patients with early-stage breast carcinoma, which consist of excess treatment costs for bone fracture and excess costs of long-term care for bone fracture, were evaluated by using the 1997-1998 Standard Analytical File. The statistical significance of the difference in inpatient costs, medical treatment costs, and long-term care admission rates were determined with the t test and the Fisher chi-square test, respectively. RESULTS. For older women with early-stage breast carcinoma, the direct costs for bone fracture were estimated at $45,579, and 57% of those costs came from treating the bone fracture (32% came from inpatient hospital costs, and 25% came from noninpatient hospital costs), 25% came from other excess treatment costs, and 18% came from excess long-term care costs. The women who had early-stage breast carcinoma and sustained bone fracture did not differ significantly from the women without early-stage breast carcinoma who sustained a bone fracture. CONCLUSIONS. Bone fracture was associated with high direct costs in older women with early-stage breast carcinoma. Additional research should include appropriate, incidence-based studies to investigate the potential benefit of an intervention for preventing bone fracture in this increasingly large patient population.},
  author       = {Zhou, ZY and Redaelli, A and Johnell, Olof and Willke, RJ and Massimini, G},
  issn         = {1097-0142},
  keyword      = {bone fracture,breast carcinoma,cost consequence analysis,excess,excess long term care cost,treatment cost},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {507--517},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Cancer},
  title        = {A retrospective analysis of health care costs for bone fractures in women with early-stage breast carcinoma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11917},
  volume       = {100},
  year         = {2004},
}