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Cages in tandem: Management control, social identity, and identification in a knowledge-intensive firm

Kärreman, Dan LU and Alvesson, Mats LU (2004) In Organization 11(1). p.149-175
Abstract
Developments in organization studies downplay the role of bureaucracy in favour of more flexible arrangements and forms of organizational control, including socio-ideological control. Corporate culture and regulated social identities are assumed to provide means for the integration and orchestration of work. Knowledge-intensive firms, which typically draw heavily upon socio-ideological modes of control, are often singled out as organizational forms that use social identity and the corporatization of the self as a mode for managerial control. In this article we explore and discuss social identity and identification in a large IT/management consultancy firm with a strong presence of socio-ideological or normative control, but also with... (More)
Developments in organization studies downplay the role of bureaucracy in favour of more flexible arrangements and forms of organizational control, including socio-ideological control. Corporate culture and regulated social identities are assumed to provide means for the integration and orchestration of work. Knowledge-intensive firms, which typically draw heavily upon socio-ideological modes of control, are often singled out as organizational forms that use social identity and the corporatization of the self as a mode for managerial control. In this article we explore and discuss social identity and identification in a large IT/management consultancy firm with a strong presence of socio-ideological or normative control, but also with strong bureaucratic features. Structural forms of control-formal HRM procedures and performance pressures are considered in relation to socio-ideological control. We identify organizational and individual consequences of identification in a context of social, structural, and cultural 'closures' and contradictions, including the tendency to create an 'iron cage of subjectivity'. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Organization
volume
11
issue
1
pages
149 - 175
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000188396700008
  • scopus:1642499332
ISSN
1350-5084
DOI
10.1177/1350508404039662
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5d2d8117-0def-4ec2-b42f-c1432d80dd20 (old id 899436)
date added to LUP
2008-01-15 12:42:44
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:28:23
@article{5d2d8117-0def-4ec2-b42f-c1432d80dd20,
  abstract     = {Developments in organization studies downplay the role of bureaucracy in favour of more flexible arrangements and forms of organizational control, including socio-ideological control. Corporate culture and regulated social identities are assumed to provide means for the integration and orchestration of work. Knowledge-intensive firms, which typically draw heavily upon socio-ideological modes of control, are often singled out as organizational forms that use social identity and the corporatization of the self as a mode for managerial control. In this article we explore and discuss social identity and identification in a large IT/management consultancy firm with a strong presence of socio-ideological or normative control, but also with strong bureaucratic features. Structural forms of control-formal HRM procedures and performance pressures are considered in relation to socio-ideological control. We identify organizational and individual consequences of identification in a context of social, structural, and cultural 'closures' and contradictions, including the tendency to create an 'iron cage of subjectivity'.},
  author       = {Kärreman, Dan and Alvesson, Mats},
  issn         = {1350-5084},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {149--175},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Organization},
  title        = {Cages in tandem: Management control, social identity, and identification in a knowledge-intensive firm},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350508404039662},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2004},
}