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The body and doing gender: the relations between doctors and nurses in hospital work

Davies, Karen LU (2003) In Sociology of Health & Illness 25(7). p.720-742
Abstract
This article attempts to show how the concept of the body - as it has been applied in feminist thought - can be utilised in trying to understand the changing and at times problematic working relations between doctors and nurses in Sweden. Three approaches are applied with respect to the body: (1) Doctors and nurses belong to two different collective bodies which embody historical constructions of masculinity and femininity - which in turn have influenced how members of each corps have seen and worked with the other and how they approach each other even in the present day. (2) Gender is inscribed on the body. It is contended that in social encounters we never interact with each other as genderless beings, although we may very well take... (More)
This article attempts to show how the concept of the body - as it has been applied in feminist thought - can be utilised in trying to understand the changing and at times problematic working relations between doctors and nurses in Sweden. Three approaches are applied with respect to the body: (1) Doctors and nurses belong to two different collective bodies which embody historical constructions of masculinity and femininity - which in turn have influenced how members of each corps have seen and worked with the other and how they approach each other even in the present day. (2) Gender is inscribed on the body. It is contended that in social encounters we never interact with each other as genderless beings, although we may very well take gender for granted and its importance may possibly be most salient in initial encounters. A nurse, then, never just interacts with a doctor - it is a female doctor or a male doctor and this makes a difference. 'Doing gender' is accomplished in these practices. (3) There is the question of situatedness - where (hospital staff) bodies find themselves on the ward and in the hospital in the daily run of things. Space and place are not neutral but are linked to relations of power and gender and class. How dome dominance and doing deference are accomplished - but also changed - in hospital work is addressed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
feminist theory, relations, power, situatedness, nurses, women doctors, doing gender, the body
in
Sociology of Health & Illness
volume
25
issue
7
pages
720 - 742
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000187058300002
  • scopus:0348110530
ISSN
1467-9566
DOI
10.1046/j.1467-9566.2003.00367.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5cb1093-83c9-4fdb-95d4-073799375389 (old id 899640)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 19:20:00
date last changed
2018-01-07 08:44:32
@article{f5cb1093-83c9-4fdb-95d4-073799375389,
  abstract     = {This article attempts to show how the concept of the body - as it has been applied in feminist thought - can be utilised in trying to understand the changing and at times problematic working relations between doctors and nurses in Sweden. Three approaches are applied with respect to the body: (1) Doctors and nurses belong to two different collective bodies which embody historical constructions of masculinity and femininity - which in turn have influenced how members of each corps have seen and worked with the other and how they approach each other even in the present day. (2) Gender is inscribed on the body. It is contended that in social encounters we never interact with each other as genderless beings, although we may very well take gender for granted and its importance may possibly be most salient in initial encounters. A nurse, then, never just interacts with a doctor - it is a female doctor or a male doctor and this makes a difference. 'Doing gender' is accomplished in these practices. (3) There is the question of situatedness - where (hospital staff) bodies find themselves on the ward and in the hospital in the daily run of things. Space and place are not neutral but are linked to relations of power and gender and class. How dome dominance and doing deference are accomplished - but also changed - in hospital work is addressed.},
  author       = {Davies, Karen},
  issn         = {1467-9566},
  keyword      = {feminist theory,relations,power,situatedness,nurses,women doctors,doing gender,the body},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {720--742},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Sociology of Health & Illness},
  title        = {The body and doing gender: the relations between doctors and nurses in hospital work},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1467-9566.2003.00367.x},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2003},
}