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Trends and recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries : Triangulation of review and survey data

Egerod, Ingrid ; Kaldan, Gudrun ; Lindahl, Berit LU ; Hansen, Britt Sætre ; Jensen, Janet Froulund ; Collet, Marie Oxenbøll ; Halvorsen, Kristin ; Eriksson, Thomas ; Olausson, Sepideh and Jensen, Hanne Irene (2020) In Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 56. p.1-8
Abstract

Background: Priorities for critical care nursing research have evolved with societal trends and values. In the 1980s priorities were the nursing workforce, in 1990s technical nursing, in 2000s evidence-based nursing and in 2010s symptom management and family-centred care. Objectives: To identify current trends and future recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries. Methods: We triangulated the results of a literature review and a survey. A review of two selected critical care nursing journals (2016–2017) was conducted using content analysis to identify contemporary published research. A self-administered computerised cross-sectional survey of Nordic critical care nursing researchers (2017) reported current... (More)

Background: Priorities for critical care nursing research have evolved with societal trends and values. In the 1980s priorities were the nursing workforce, in 1990s technical nursing, in 2000s evidence-based nursing and in 2010s symptom management and family-centred care. Objectives: To identify current trends and future recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries. Methods: We triangulated the results of a literature review and a survey. A review of two selected critical care nursing journals (2016–2017) was conducted using content analysis to identify contemporary published research. A self-administered computerised cross-sectional survey of Nordic critical care nursing researchers (2017) reported current and future areas of research. Results: A review of 156 papers identified research related to the patient (13%), family (12%), nurse (31%), and therapies (44%). Current trends in the survey (n = 76, response rate 65%) included patient and family involvement, nurse performance and education, and evidence-based protocols. The datasets showed similar trends, but aftercare was only present in the survey. Future trends included symptom management, transitions, rehabilitation, and new nursing roles. Conclusion: Critical care nursing research is trending toward increased collaboration with patient and family, delineating a shift toward user values. Recommendations include long-term outcomes and impact of nursing.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Critical care nursing, Intensive care unit, Research priorities, Review, Survey
in
Intensive and Critical Care Nursing
volume
56
article number
102765
pages
1 - 8
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85074502863
  • pmid:31685257
ISSN
0964-3397
DOI
10.1016/j.iccn.2019.102765
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
89a71e50-0152-4431-a109-71d587a8fd79
date added to LUP
2020-03-25 16:15:54
date last changed
2020-03-26 01:57:17
@article{89a71e50-0152-4431-a109-71d587a8fd79,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Priorities for critical care nursing research have evolved with societal trends and values. In the 1980s priorities were the nursing workforce, in 1990s technical nursing, in 2000s evidence-based nursing and in 2010s symptom management and family-centred care. Objectives: To identify current trends and future recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries. Methods: We triangulated the results of a literature review and a survey. A review of two selected critical care nursing journals (2016–2017) was conducted using content analysis to identify contemporary published research. A self-administered computerised cross-sectional survey of Nordic critical care nursing researchers (2017) reported current and future areas of research. Results: A review of 156 papers identified research related to the patient (13%), family (12%), nurse (31%), and therapies (44%). Current trends in the survey (n = 76, response rate 65%) included patient and family involvement, nurse performance and education, and evidence-based protocols. The datasets showed similar trends, but aftercare was only present in the survey. Future trends included symptom management, transitions, rehabilitation, and new nursing roles. Conclusion: Critical care nursing research is trending toward increased collaboration with patient and family, delineating a shift toward user values. Recommendations include long-term outcomes and impact of nursing.</p>},
  author       = {Egerod, Ingrid and Kaldan, Gudrun and Lindahl, Berit and Hansen, Britt Sætre and Jensen, Janet Froulund and Collet, Marie Oxenbøll and Halvorsen, Kristin and Eriksson, Thomas and Olausson, Sepideh and Jensen, Hanne Irene},
  issn         = {0964-3397},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--8},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Intensive and Critical Care Nursing},
  title        = {Trends and recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries : Triangulation of review and survey data},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2019.102765},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.iccn.2019.102765},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2020},
}