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Seizure disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus results from an international, prospective, inception cohort study

Hanly, John G.; Urowitz, Murray B.; Su, Li; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Wallace, Daniel J.; Clarke, Ann E. and Ginzler, E. M., et al. (2012) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 71(9). p.1502-1509
Abstract
Objective The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics, or SLICC, performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrolment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-beta(2) glycoprotein-I, antiribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrolment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the... (More)
Objective The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics, or SLICC, performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrolment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-beta(2) glycoprotein-I, antiribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrolment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 (36-Item Short Form Health Survey) mental component summary and physical component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow-up of 3.5 +/- 2.9 years. Of 1631 patients, 75 (4.6%) had >= 1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR (CI): 1.97 (1.07 to 3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21 to 3.19); p<0.01). Higher damage scores (without neuropsychiatric variables) were associated with an increased risk of subsequent seizures (SDI=1:3.93 (1.46 to 10.55); SDI=2 or 3:1.57 (0.32 to 7.65); SDI >= 4:7.86 (0.89 to 69.06); p=0.03). There was an association with disease activity but not with autoantibodies. Seizures attributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78 (76%)) in the absence of antiseizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the mental component summary or physical component summary scores. Antimalarial drugs in the absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07 (0.01 to 0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Antimalarial drugs were associated with a protective effect. (Less)
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Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
71
issue
9
pages
1502 - 1509
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000307646500013
  • scopus:84864868783
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-201089
language
English
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yes
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2012-10-05 07:16:35
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2019-06-25 01:46:20
@article{8a95409c-9559-4b00-96fc-61ba5161d0ce,
  abstract     = {Objective The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics, or SLICC, performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrolment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-beta(2) glycoprotein-I, antiribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrolment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 (36-Item Short Form Health Survey) mental component summary and physical component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow-up of 3.5 +/- 2.9 years. Of 1631 patients, 75 (4.6%) had &gt;= 1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR (CI): 1.97 (1.07 to 3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21 to 3.19); p&lt;0.01). Higher damage scores (without neuropsychiatric variables) were associated with an increased risk of subsequent seizures (SDI=1:3.93 (1.46 to 10.55); SDI=2 or 3:1.57 (0.32 to 7.65); SDI &gt;= 4:7.86 (0.89 to 69.06); p=0.03). There was an association with disease activity but not with autoantibodies. Seizures attributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78 (76%)) in the absence of antiseizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the mental component summary or physical component summary scores. Antimalarial drugs in the absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07 (0.01 to 0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Antimalarial drugs were associated with a protective effect.},
  author       = {Hanly, John G. and Urowitz, Murray B. and Su, Li and Gordon, Caroline and Bae, Sang-Cheol and Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge and Romero-Diaz, Juanita and Wallace, Daniel J. and Clarke, Ann E. and Ginzler, E. M. and Merrill, Joan T. and Isenberg, David A. and Rahman, Anisur and Petri, M. and Fortin, Paul R. and Gladman, D. D. and Bruce, Ian N. and Steinsson, Kristjan and Dooley, M. A. and Khamashta, Munther A. and Alarcon, Graciela S. and Fessler, Barri J. and Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind and Manzi, Susan and Zoma, Asad A. and Sturfelt, Gunnar and Nived, Ola and Aranow, Cynthia and Mackay, Meggan and Ramos-Casals, Manuel and van Vollenhoven, R. F. and Kalunian, Kenneth C. and Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo and Lim, Sam and Kamen, Diane L. and Peschken, Christine A. and Inanc, Murat and Theriault, Chris and Thompson, Kara and Farewell, Vernon},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1502--1509},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Seizure disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus results from an international, prospective, inception cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-201089},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2012},
}