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Depression as a predictor of hospitalization due to coronary heart disease

Sundquist, Jan LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Johansson, Sven-Erik LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2005) In American Journal of Preventive Medicine 29(5). p.33-428
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that patients with depression have higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) than people in the general population. However, large-scale population-based data on incidence rates of CHD in people with depression are needed. This study analyzed whether hospitalization for depression predicts CHD in men and women after accounting for socioeconomic status and geographic region.

METHODS: Data from the family coronary heart disease database at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, were used to identify all people in Sweden aged 25 to 64 at onset of depression and aged 25 to 79 at onset of nonfatal CHD during the study period (1987 to 2001). Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of CHD among those with and... (More)

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that patients with depression have higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) than people in the general population. However, large-scale population-based data on incidence rates of CHD in people with depression are needed. This study analyzed whether hospitalization for depression predicts CHD in men and women after accounting for socioeconomic status and geographic region.

METHODS: Data from the family coronary heart disease database at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, were used to identify all people in Sweden aged 25 to 64 at onset of depression and aged 25 to 79 at onset of nonfatal CHD during the study period (1987 to 2001). Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of CHD among those with and without depression were compared. All analyses were conducted in 2005.

RESULTS: There were 1767 cases of CHD among those with depression during the study period. The risk of developing CHD was strongest for those aged <40; the SIR was 2.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.50-3.03). The risk was attenuated with increasing age in both men and women. People aged 70 to 79 at onset of depression did not have an increased risk of CHD.

CONCLUSIONS: Even after accounting for socioeconomic status and geographic region, depression is a clinically significant risk factor for developing CHD, especially in men and women aged 25 to 50. Primary healthcare teams should make particular efforts to identify young to middle-aged women and men who have depression, especially in combination with other CHD risk factors.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Aged, Comorbidity, Coronary Disease, Databases, Factual, Depression, Female, Hospitalization/trends, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, State Medicine, Sweden
in
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
volume
29
issue
5
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:29144468929
ISSN
0749-3797
DOI
10.1016/j.amepre.2005.08.002
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
8b91e3f6-6a68-4e79-8009-cbb4983ccab6
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:15:57
date last changed
2019-04-30 04:07:56
@article{8b91e3f6-6a68-4e79-8009-cbb4983ccab6,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that patients with depression have higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) than people in the general population. However, large-scale population-based data on incidence rates of CHD in people with depression are needed. This study analyzed whether hospitalization for depression predicts CHD in men and women after accounting for socioeconomic status and geographic region.</p><p>METHODS: Data from the family coronary heart disease database at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, were used to identify all people in Sweden aged 25 to 64 at onset of depression and aged 25 to 79 at onset of nonfatal CHD during the study period (1987 to 2001). Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of CHD among those with and without depression were compared. All analyses were conducted in 2005.</p><p>RESULTS: There were 1767 cases of CHD among those with depression during the study period. The risk of developing CHD was strongest for those aged &lt;40; the SIR was 2.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.50-3.03). The risk was attenuated with increasing age in both men and women. People aged 70 to 79 at onset of depression did not have an increased risk of CHD.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Even after accounting for socioeconomic status and geographic region, depression is a clinically significant risk factor for developing CHD, especially in men and women aged 25 to 50. Primary healthcare teams should make particular efforts to identify young to middle-aged women and men who have depression, especially in combination with other CHD risk factors.</p>},
  author       = {Sundquist, Jan and Li, Xinjun and Johansson, Sven-Erik and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {0749-3797},
  keyword      = {Adult,Aged,Comorbidity,Coronary Disease,Databases, Factual,Depression,Female,Hospitalization/trends,Humans,Male,Middle Aged,State Medicine,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {33--428},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
  title        = {Depression as a predictor of hospitalization due to coronary heart disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2005.08.002},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2005},
}