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Changes in encoding of path of motion after acquisition of a second language

Brown, Amanda and Gullberg, Marianne LU (2010) In Cognitive Linguistics 21(2). p.263-286
Abstract
Languages vary typologically in their lexicalization of Path of motion (Talmy 1991). Furthermore, lexicalization patterns are argued to affect syntactic packaging at the level of the clause (e.g. Slobin 1996b) and tend to transfer from a first (L1) to a second language (L2) in second language acquisition (e.g. Cadierno 2004). From this crosslinguistic and developmental evidence, typological preferences for Path expression appear highly robust features of a first language. The current study examines the extent to which preferences for Path encoding really are as enduring as they seem by investigating (1) whether Japanese follows patterns identified for other verb-framed languages like Spanish, and (2) whether patterns established in one’s... (More)
Languages vary typologically in their lexicalization of Path of motion (Talmy 1991). Furthermore, lexicalization patterns are argued to affect syntactic packaging at the level of the clause (e.g. Slobin 1996b) and tend to transfer from a first (L1) to a second language (L2) in second language acquisition (e.g. Cadierno 2004). From this crosslinguistic and developmental evidence, typological preferences for Path expression appear highly robust features of a first language. The current study examines the extent to which preferences for Path encoding really are as enduring as they seem by investigating (1) whether Japanese follows patterns identified for other verb-framed languages like Spanish, and (2) whether patterns established in one’s first language can change after acquisition of a second language. L1 performance of native speakers of Japanese with intermediate-level knowledge of English was compared to that of monolingual speakers of Japanese and English. Results showed that monolingual Japanese speakers followed basic lexicalization patterns typical of other verb-framed languages, but with different realizations of Path packaging within the clause. Moreover, non-monolingual Japanese speakers displayed both English- and Japanese-like patterns for lexicalization with significantly more Path information per clause than either group of monolinguals. Implications for typology and second language acquisition are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
crosslinguistic influence, second language acquisition, motion events, attrition, path, Japanese, English
in
Cognitive Linguistics
volume
21
issue
2
pages
263 - 286
publisher
Mouton de Gruyter
external identifiers
  • scopus:77953857803
ISSN
1613-3641
DOI
10.1515/COGL.2010.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8d258c1b-dd93-43b2-9205-6a5345f2a335 (old id 1578850)
date added to LUP
2010-06-02 14:45:11
date last changed
2017-06-25 04:34:18
@article{8d258c1b-dd93-43b2-9205-6a5345f2a335,
  abstract     = {Languages vary typologically in their lexicalization of Path of motion (Talmy 1991). Furthermore, lexicalization patterns are argued to affect syntactic packaging at the level of the clause (e.g. Slobin 1996b) and tend to transfer from a first (L1) to a second language (L2) in second language acquisition (e.g. Cadierno 2004). From this crosslinguistic and developmental evidence, typological preferences for Path expression appear highly robust features of a first language. The current study examines the extent to which preferences for Path encoding really are as enduring as they seem by investigating (1) whether Japanese follows patterns identified for other verb-framed languages like Spanish, and (2) whether patterns established in one’s first language can change after acquisition of a second language. L1 performance of native speakers of Japanese with intermediate-level knowledge of English was compared to that of monolingual speakers of Japanese and English. Results showed that monolingual Japanese speakers followed basic lexicalization patterns typical of other verb-framed languages, but with different realizations of Path packaging within the clause. Moreover, non-monolingual Japanese speakers displayed both English- and Japanese-like patterns for lexicalization with significantly more Path information per clause than either group of monolinguals. Implications for typology and second language acquisition are discussed.},
  author       = {Brown, Amanda and Gullberg, Marianne},
  issn         = {1613-3641},
  keyword      = {crosslinguistic influence,second language acquisition,motion events,attrition,path,Japanese,English},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {263--286},
  publisher    = {Mouton de Gruyter},
  series       = {Cognitive Linguistics},
  title        = {Changes in encoding of path of motion after acquisition of a second language},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/COGL.2010.010},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}