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'All they do is win' : Lessons learned from use of a serious game for Circular Economy education

Whalen, Katherine A. LU ; Berlin, Cecilia; Ekberg, Johanna; Barletta, Ilaria and Hammersberg, Peter (2017) In Resources, Conservation and Recycling
Abstract

This paper aims to explore how learning about Circular Economy (CE) may be facilitated through the use of the serious game In the Loop. Despite the growing literature base related to CE, academic reflection on education for a CE is currently limited. In the Loop was developed to provide an experiential learning situation for educating about material criticality and CE. This study reflects on the use of the game with engineering students pursuing higher education. Seventy-one reflections, written after students played the game, were qualitatively coded through the use of a-priori coding. This paper presents the findings from analysis of four themes: Gameplay, Systems Thinking, Material Criticality, and Realism/Real World Connection. Use... (More)

This paper aims to explore how learning about Circular Economy (CE) may be facilitated through the use of the serious game In the Loop. Despite the growing literature base related to CE, academic reflection on education for a CE is currently limited. In the Loop was developed to provide an experiential learning situation for educating about material criticality and CE. This study reflects on the use of the game with engineering students pursuing higher education. Seventy-one reflections, written after students played the game, were qualitatively coded through the use of a-priori coding. This paper presents the findings from analysis of four themes: Gameplay, Systems Thinking, Material Criticality, and Realism/Real World Connection. Use of the game encouraged students to think holistically and reflect on material criticality. Students highlighted the importance of adopting strategies, including CE concepts, to address resource challenges, with many reflecting on how their own actions and abilities could play a role. Moreover, the study suggests In the Loop has broader relevance than engineering education alone and appears to confirm previous research on the benefits of using games to facilitate systems thinking.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Circular economy, Higher education, Material scarcity, Serious games, Systems thinking
categories
Higher Education
in
Resources, Conservation and Recycling
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85025479308
ISSN
0921-3449
DOI
10.1016/j.resconrec.2017.06.021
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8e71f584-f97b-4678-b6be-578c6a7a0ce3
date added to LUP
2017-07-31 13:48:27
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:13:42
@article{8e71f584-f97b-4678-b6be-578c6a7a0ce3,
  abstract     = {<p>This paper aims to explore how learning about Circular Economy (CE) may be facilitated through the use of the serious game In the Loop. Despite the growing literature base related to CE, academic reflection on education for a CE is currently limited. In the Loop was developed to provide an experiential learning situation for educating about material criticality and CE. This study reflects on the use of the game with engineering students pursuing higher education. Seventy-one reflections, written after students played the game, were qualitatively coded through the use of a-priori coding. This paper presents the findings from analysis of four themes: Gameplay, Systems Thinking, Material Criticality, and Realism/Real World Connection. Use of the game encouraged students to think holistically and reflect on material criticality. Students highlighted the importance of adopting strategies, including CE concepts, to address resource challenges, with many reflecting on how their own actions and abilities could play a role. Moreover, the study suggests In the Loop has broader relevance than engineering education alone and appears to confirm previous research on the benefits of using games to facilitate systems thinking.</p>},
  author       = {Whalen, Katherine A. and Berlin, Cecilia and Ekberg, Johanna and Barletta, Ilaria and Hammersberg, Peter},
  issn         = {0921-3449},
  keyword      = {Circular economy,Higher education,Material scarcity,Serious games,Systems thinking},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Resources, Conservation and Recycling},
  title        = {'All they do is win' : Lessons learned from use of a serious game for Circular Economy education},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2017.06.021},
  year         = {2017},
}