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Retrospective dosimetry using salted snacks and nuts : A feasibility study

Christiansson, M. LU ; Geber-Bergstrand, T. LU ; Bernhardsson, C. LU ; Mattsson, S. LU and Raäf, C. L. LU (2017) In Radiation Protection Dosimetry 174(1). p.1-5
Abstract

The possibility of using ordinary household table salt for dosimetry is suggested by its high sensitivity to ionising radiation, which generates a readout of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). However, to exploit this finding for retrospective human dosimetry, it would be needed to find salt in close proximity to the exposed individual. Finding salty snacks frequently tucked into handbags, backpacks or pockets seemed to be a possibility; these items therefore became the test materials of the present study. The aluminium or cardboard packages used to exclude the moisture that makes crisps and nuts go soft and stale also helps to retain the induced OSL signal. Therefore, different snacks, either their salt component alone or mixed... (More)

The possibility of using ordinary household table salt for dosimetry is suggested by its high sensitivity to ionising radiation, which generates a readout of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). However, to exploit this finding for retrospective human dosimetry, it would be needed to find salt in close proximity to the exposed individual. Finding salty snacks frequently tucked into handbags, backpacks or pockets seemed to be a possibility; these items therefore became the test materials of the present study. The aluminium or cardboard packages used to exclude the moisture that makes crisps and nuts go soft and stale also helps to retain the induced OSL signal. Therefore, different snacks, either their salt component alone or mixed with the snack, are exposed to ionising radiation and then were assessed for their dosimetric properties. The results indicate the feasibility of using some salty snacks for dosimetry, with a minimum detectable dose as low as 0.2 mGy.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Radiation Protection Dosimetry
volume
174
issue
1
pages
5 pages
publisher
Nuclear Technology Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019133222
  • wos:000400876200001
ISSN
0144-8420
DOI
10.1093/rpd/ncw044
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8ed29e7e-dcba-4801-a7f8-a192e2ebd1eb
date added to LUP
2017-06-08 14:19:18
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:39:40
@article{8ed29e7e-dcba-4801-a7f8-a192e2ebd1eb,
  abstract     = {<p>The possibility of using ordinary household table salt for dosimetry is suggested by its high sensitivity to ionising radiation, which generates a readout of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). However, to exploit this finding for retrospective human dosimetry, it would be needed to find salt in close proximity to the exposed individual. Finding salty snacks frequently tucked into handbags, backpacks or pockets seemed to be a possibility; these items therefore became the test materials of the present study. The aluminium or cardboard packages used to exclude the moisture that makes crisps and nuts go soft and stale also helps to retain the induced OSL signal. Therefore, different snacks, either their salt component alone or mixed with the snack, are exposed to ionising radiation and then were assessed for their dosimetric properties. The results indicate the feasibility of using some salty snacks for dosimetry, with a minimum detectable dose as low as 0.2 mGy.</p>},
  articleno    = {ncw044},
  author       = {Christiansson, M. and Geber-Bergstrand, T. and Bernhardsson, C. and Mattsson, S. and Raäf, C. L.},
  issn         = {0144-8420},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {Nuclear Technology Publishing},
  series       = {Radiation Protection Dosimetry},
  title        = {Retrospective dosimetry using salted snacks and nuts : A feasibility study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/ncw044},
  volume       = {174},
  year         = {2017},
}