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Joining, belonging, and re-valuing : a process of meaning-making through group participation in a mental health lifestyle intervention

Lund, Kristine LU ; Argentzell, Elisabeth LU ; Leufstadius, Christel LU ; Tjörnstrand, Carina LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2017) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy p.1-13
Abstract

Background: Balancing Everyday Life (BEL), a new group-based intervention for mental health service users, was implemented in Sweden. Mental health service users often experience group interventions as meaningful, but knowledge of the process of meaning-making in a group is lacking. Aim: To explore participants’ perceptions of the group in the Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) lifestyle intervention; specifically, personal experiences of what brings meaning when participating in a group. Methods: This qualitative Grounded Theory study included 26 interviews with 19 BEL participants. Results: A process of meaning-making in a group was constructed: Joining with others: from feeling alone to connected, A sense of belonging: mutual support and... (More)

Background: Balancing Everyday Life (BEL), a new group-based intervention for mental health service users, was implemented in Sweden. Mental health service users often experience group interventions as meaningful, but knowledge of the process of meaning-making in a group is lacking. Aim: To explore participants’ perceptions of the group in the Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) lifestyle intervention; specifically, personal experiences of what brings meaning when participating in a group. Methods: This qualitative Grounded Theory study included 26 interviews with 19 BEL participants. Results: A process of meaning-making in a group was constructed: Joining with others: from feeling alone to connected, A sense of belonging: mutual support and understanding, and Re-valuing Self: respect and self-worth. No longer feeling alone contributed to meaning. Peers and group leaders were considered important parts of the group, and participants appreciated feeling understood, respected, and helping others. Conclusion: The proposed process of meaning-making, as well as ‘Joining’ as a unique step, seems to be new contributions which could help practitioners when organizing groups. Overcoming fear of joining could break a cycle of isolation and lead to connecting and belonging. The value of participants finding purpose through helping others should be further explored.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
grounded theory, group intervention, groups, lifestyle, meaning, mental health, Mental illness, occupational therapy
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
pages
13 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85035104091
ISSN
1103-8128
DOI
10.1080/11038128.2017.1409266
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8ee07566-9b63-4afe-a567-ace97c667c30
date added to LUP
2017-12-12 12:47:49
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:28:28
@article{8ee07566-9b63-4afe-a567-ace97c667c30,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Balancing Everyday Life (BEL), a new group-based intervention for mental health service users, was implemented in Sweden. Mental health service users often experience group interventions as meaningful, but knowledge of the process of meaning-making in a group is lacking. Aim: To explore participants’ perceptions of the group in the Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) lifestyle intervention; specifically, personal experiences of what brings meaning when participating in a group. Methods: This qualitative Grounded Theory study included 26 interviews with 19 BEL participants. Results: A process of meaning-making in a group was constructed: Joining with others: from feeling alone to connected, A sense of belonging: mutual support and understanding, and Re-valuing Self: respect and self-worth. No longer feeling alone contributed to meaning. Peers and group leaders were considered important parts of the group, and participants appreciated feeling understood, respected, and helping others. Conclusion: The proposed process of meaning-making, as well as ‘Joining’ as a unique step, seems to be new contributions which could help practitioners when organizing groups. Overcoming fear of joining could break a cycle of isolation and lead to connecting and belonging. The value of participants finding purpose through helping others should be further explored.</p>},
  author       = {Lund, Kristine and Argentzell, Elisabeth and Leufstadius, Christel and Tjörnstrand, Carina and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1103-8128},
  keyword      = {grounded theory,group intervention,groups,lifestyle,meaning,mental health,Mental illness,occupational therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {1--13},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Joining, belonging, and re-valuing : a process of meaning-making through group participation in a mental health lifestyle intervention},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038128.2017.1409266},
  year         = {2017},
}