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Cost-equivalence of different osteoporotic fractures

Melton, LJ; Gabriel, SE; Crowson, CS; Tosteson, ANA; Johnell, Olof LU and Kanis, JA (2003) In Osteoporosis International 14(5). p.383-388
Abstract
Methods. Among 985 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who experienced an osteoporotic fracture (distal forearm, humerus, clavicle/scapula/sternum, ribs, vertebrae, pelvis, hip, other femur or tibia/fibula [the latter in women only]), we estimated the incremental cost of direct medical care in the following year compared with age- and sex-matched controls without a fracture randomly sampled from the same community. Results. The overall median incremental (case minus control) cost in the succeeding year was $2390, with a particularly high incremental cost for hip fractures ($11,241). There was fair concordance between the incremental cost of the different fractures, relative to hip fracture alone, and the previously published disutility... (More)
Methods. Among 985 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who experienced an osteoporotic fracture (distal forearm, humerus, clavicle/scapula/sternum, ribs, vertebrae, pelvis, hip, other femur or tibia/fibula [the latter in women only]), we estimated the incremental cost of direct medical care in the following year compared with age- and sex-matched controls without a fracture randomly sampled from the same community. Results. The overall median incremental (case minus control) cost in the succeeding year was $2390, with a particularly high incremental cost for hip fractures ($11,241). There was fair concordance between the incremental cost of the different fractures, relative to hip fracture alone, and the previously published disutility associated with each fracture type relative to hip fracture. Overall, the incremental cost for all osteoporotic fractures combined was 46% greater than that for hip fractures alone in women and 47% greater in men. This is consistent with the earlier report that overall morbidity from all osteoporotic fractures combined is 47% and 39% greater in women and men, respectively, than the morbidity attributable solely to hip fractures. Conclusion. These data lend support to the notion that other osteoporotic fractures can be quantified relative to hip fracture on the basis of their cost, as well as their morbidity and mortality. This may simplify health economic analyses by allowing all fracture outcomes to be modeled relative to hip fractures (i.e., hip fracture 'equivalents') and will provide a more comprehensive assessment of osteoporosis outcomes than is possible by focusing only on hip fractures. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, cost analysis, hip fracture, forearm fracture, vertebral fracture, osteoporosis
in
Osteoporosis International
volume
14
issue
5
pages
383 - 388
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000184294200004
  • pmid:12730750
  • scopus:0041705941
ISSN
1433-2965
DOI
10.1007/s00198-003-1385-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4394ae07-f325-4f01-8c09-76c2611c9308 (old id 900096)
date added to LUP
2008-01-15 08:50:15
date last changed
2018-02-11 04:02:12
@article{4394ae07-f325-4f01-8c09-76c2611c9308,
  abstract     = {Methods. Among 985 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who experienced an osteoporotic fracture (distal forearm, humerus, clavicle/scapula/sternum, ribs, vertebrae, pelvis, hip, other femur or tibia/fibula [the latter in women only]), we estimated the incremental cost of direct medical care in the following year compared with age- and sex-matched controls without a fracture randomly sampled from the same community. Results. The overall median incremental (case minus control) cost in the succeeding year was $2390, with a particularly high incremental cost for hip fractures ($11,241). There was fair concordance between the incremental cost of the different fractures, relative to hip fracture alone, and the previously published disutility associated with each fracture type relative to hip fracture. Overall, the incremental cost for all osteoporotic fractures combined was 46% greater than that for hip fractures alone in women and 47% greater in men. This is consistent with the earlier report that overall morbidity from all osteoporotic fractures combined is 47% and 39% greater in women and men, respectively, than the morbidity attributable solely to hip fractures. Conclusion. These data lend support to the notion that other osteoporotic fractures can be quantified relative to hip fracture on the basis of their cost, as well as their morbidity and mortality. This may simplify health economic analyses by allowing all fracture outcomes to be modeled relative to hip fractures (i.e., hip fracture 'equivalents') and will provide a more comprehensive assessment of osteoporosis outcomes than is possible by focusing only on hip fractures.},
  author       = {Melton, LJ and Gabriel, SE and Crowson, CS and Tosteson, ANA and Johnell, Olof and Kanis, JA},
  issn         = {1433-2965},
  keyword      = {epidemiology,cost analysis,hip fracture,forearm fracture,vertebral fracture,osteoporosis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {383--388},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Osteoporosis International},
  title        = {Cost-equivalence of different osteoporotic fractures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-003-1385-4},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2003},
}