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Reduced level of serum thiols in patients with a diagnosis of active disease

Banne, AF; Amiri, Amir LU and Pero, Ronald LU (2003) In Journal of Anti-Aging Medicine 6(4). p.327-334
Abstract
Oxidative stress, or the production of oxygen-centered free radicals, has been hypothesized as the major source of DNA damage that in turn can lead to altered genetic expression, disease, and aging of humans. Serum protein thiol levels in blood are a direct measure of the in vivo reduction/oxidation (redox) status in humans, because thiols react readily with oxygen-containing free radicals to form disulfides. Moreover, serum thiols also reflect DNA repair capacity and the possible eventual accumulation of genetic damage, since a key DNA repair enzyme, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), is thiol/disulfide redox regulated. This study tests the hypothesis that serum protein thiols can be used to estimate individual aging status by comparing... (More)
Oxidative stress, or the production of oxygen-centered free radicals, has been hypothesized as the major source of DNA damage that in turn can lead to altered genetic expression, disease, and aging of humans. Serum protein thiol levels in blood are a direct measure of the in vivo reduction/oxidation (redox) status in humans, because thiols react readily with oxygen-containing free radicals to form disulfides. Moreover, serum thiols also reflect DNA repair capacity and the possible eventual accumulation of genetic damage, since a key DNA repair enzyme, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), is thiol/disulfide redox regulated. This study tests the hypothesis that serum protein thiols can be used to estimate individual aging status by comparing the levels of apparently healthy subjects (n = 90) to those of individuals (n = 306) with an active disease diagnosis. Nine categories of human disorders all showed highly significant reductions in serum protein thiols from 46 to 91 nM cysteine/200 muL serum (mean +/- S.D. = 59 +/- 40) compared to a control mean of 128 +/- 39 nM cysteine/200 muL serum (p <.001). These data strongly confirm an important role of oxidative stress in human disease development, and identify serum thiol status as a potential biochemical endpoint useful in the assessment of aging. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Anti-Aging Medicine
volume
6
issue
4
pages
327 - 334
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:15142434
  • wos:000221134100008
  • scopus:2342566556
ISSN
1094-5458
DOI
10.1089/109454503323028920
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
82549aa3-6933-45d0-b5df-209bc03dbb25 (old id 905662)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 13:04:13
date last changed
2018-09-02 04:11:24
@article{82549aa3-6933-45d0-b5df-209bc03dbb25,
  abstract     = {Oxidative stress, or the production of oxygen-centered free radicals, has been hypothesized as the major source of DNA damage that in turn can lead to altered genetic expression, disease, and aging of humans. Serum protein thiol levels in blood are a direct measure of the in vivo reduction/oxidation (redox) status in humans, because thiols react readily with oxygen-containing free radicals to form disulfides. Moreover, serum thiols also reflect DNA repair capacity and the possible eventual accumulation of genetic damage, since a key DNA repair enzyme, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), is thiol/disulfide redox regulated. This study tests the hypothesis that serum protein thiols can be used to estimate individual aging status by comparing the levels of apparently healthy subjects (n = 90) to those of individuals (n = 306) with an active disease diagnosis. Nine categories of human disorders all showed highly significant reductions in serum protein thiols from 46 to 91 nM cysteine/200 muL serum (mean +/- S.D. = 59 +/- 40) compared to a control mean of 128 +/- 39 nM cysteine/200 muL serum (p &lt;.001). These data strongly confirm an important role of oxidative stress in human disease development, and identify serum thiol status as a potential biochemical endpoint useful in the assessment of aging.},
  author       = {Banne, AF and Amiri, Amir and Pero, Ronald},
  issn         = {1094-5458},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {327--334},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Anti-Aging Medicine},
  title        = {Reduced level of serum thiols in patients with a diagnosis of active disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/109454503323028920},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2003},
}