Advanced

PMMA particles and pressure - a study of the osteolytic properties of two agents proposed to cause prosthetic loosening

Skoglund, B and Aspenberg, Per LU (2003) In Journal of Orthopaedic Research 21(2). p.196-201
Abstract
Amongst the wear debris particles implicated in the particle hypothesis for prosthetic loosening are polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and particularly PMMA with barium sulphate contrast agent. Another suggested cause for loosening is hydrostatic pressure. PMMA particles were combined with hydrostatic pressure in a study to investigate whether there could be a synergistic or additive effect between these two factors. Titanium plates were fastened onto tibiae of 59 rats. After osseointegration, PMMA particles with barium sulphate were administered to the bone-implant interface. Further, PMMA particles were introduced into a previously published model for hydrostatic pressure induced osteolysis. There was measurable resorption in response to... (More)
Amongst the wear debris particles implicated in the particle hypothesis for prosthetic loosening are polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and particularly PMMA with barium sulphate contrast agent. Another suggested cause for loosening is hydrostatic pressure. PMMA particles were combined with hydrostatic pressure in a study to investigate whether there could be a synergistic or additive effect between these two factors. Titanium plates were fastened onto tibiae of 59 rats. After osseointegration, PMMA particles with barium sulphate were administered to the bone-implant interface. Further, PMMA particles were introduced into a previously published model for hydrostatic pressure induced osteolysis. There was measurable resorption in response to the PMMA particles but no additive or synergistic effect from introducing particles to the pressure model, and the effect of pressure was far greater than that of particles. These results suggest that, whereas particles can be shown to elicit an osteolytic response, the much less studied osteolytic effects of pressure could be far more important. (C) 2002 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
volume
21
issue
2
pages
196 - 201
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000181251900002
  • pmid:12568949
  • scopus:0037229742
ISSN
1554-527X
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
37d27ef1-e092-49c6-98b4-5ab614249833 (old id 908860)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 07:49:54
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:46:30
@article{37d27ef1-e092-49c6-98b4-5ab614249833,
  abstract     = {Amongst the wear debris particles implicated in the particle hypothesis for prosthetic loosening are polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and particularly PMMA with barium sulphate contrast agent. Another suggested cause for loosening is hydrostatic pressure. PMMA particles were combined with hydrostatic pressure in a study to investigate whether there could be a synergistic or additive effect between these two factors. Titanium plates were fastened onto tibiae of 59 rats. After osseointegration, PMMA particles with barium sulphate were administered to the bone-implant interface. Further, PMMA particles were introduced into a previously published model for hydrostatic pressure induced osteolysis. There was measurable resorption in response to the PMMA particles but no additive or synergistic effect from introducing particles to the pressure model, and the effect of pressure was far greater than that of particles. These results suggest that, whereas particles can be shown to elicit an osteolytic response, the much less studied osteolytic effects of pressure could be far more important. (C) 2002 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Skoglund, B and Aspenberg, Per},
  issn         = {1554-527X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {196--201},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Orthopaedic Research},
  title        = {PMMA particles and pressure - a study of the osteolytic properties of two agents proposed to cause prosthetic loosening},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2003},
}