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Communication and Trust in the Care Provided to a Dying Parent: A Nationwide Study of Cancer-Bereaved Youths.

Grenklo, Tove Bylund ; Kreicbergs, Ulrika C ; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A ; Nyberg, Tommy ; Steineck, Gunnar and Fürst, Carl Johan LU (2013) In Journal of Clinical Oncology
Abstract
PURPOSETo assess children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent during the final week of life in relation to end-of-life medical information about disease, treatment, and death. METHODSThis nationwide population-based survey included 622 (73%) of 851 youths who, 6 to 9 years earlier, at age 13 to 16 years, lost a parent to cancer. We asked about the children's reception of end-of-life professional information and trust in the care provided. We also asked about depression and several potential risk factors of distrust in the care provided.ResultsA majority (82%) reported moderate/very much trust in the care provided. Compared with children who received end-of-life medical information before their loss, the risk of distrust in the... (More)
PURPOSETo assess children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent during the final week of life in relation to end-of-life medical information about disease, treatment, and death. METHODSThis nationwide population-based survey included 622 (73%) of 851 youths who, 6 to 9 years earlier, at age 13 to 16 years, lost a parent to cancer. We asked about the children's reception of end-of-life professional information and trust in the care provided. We also asked about depression and several potential risk factors of distrust in the care provided.ResultsA majority (82%) reported moderate/very much trust in the care provided. Compared with children who received end-of-life medical information before their loss, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher in those who received no information (risk ratio [RR], 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.1), in those who only received information afterward (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.9), and in those who did not know or remember if end-of-life medical information was provided (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). Those reporting distrust in the care provided had an RR of 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.5) for depression. Furthermore, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher among children reporting poor efforts to cure (RR, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.3), and/or a poor relationship with the surviving parent (RR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.0 to 4.1). CONCLUSIONOur study suggests that children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent was highest when they received end-of-life medical information before their loss. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Journal of Clinical Oncology
publisher
American Society of Clinical Oncology
external identifiers
  • pmid:23857973
  • wos:000330539300013
  • scopus:84891455050
ISSN
1527-7755
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2012.46.6102
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
90b7ad59-39e1-4813-89f8-dc134b486f3c (old id 3955873)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23857973?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:29:19
date last changed
2020-05-26 01:25:29
@article{90b7ad59-39e1-4813-89f8-dc134b486f3c,
  abstract     = {PURPOSETo assess children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent during the final week of life in relation to end-of-life medical information about disease, treatment, and death. METHODSThis nationwide population-based survey included 622 (73%) of 851 youths who, 6 to 9 years earlier, at age 13 to 16 years, lost a parent to cancer. We asked about the children's reception of end-of-life professional information and trust in the care provided. We also asked about depression and several potential risk factors of distrust in the care provided.ResultsA majority (82%) reported moderate/very much trust in the care provided. Compared with children who received end-of-life medical information before their loss, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher in those who received no information (risk ratio [RR], 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.1), in those who only received information afterward (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.9), and in those who did not know or remember if end-of-life medical information was provided (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). Those reporting distrust in the care provided had an RR of 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.5) for depression. Furthermore, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher among children reporting poor efforts to cure (RR, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.3), and/or a poor relationship with the surviving parent (RR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.0 to 4.1). CONCLUSIONOur study suggests that children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent was highest when they received end-of-life medical information before their loss.},
  author       = {Grenklo, Tove Bylund and Kreicbergs, Ulrika C and Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A and Nyberg, Tommy and Steineck, Gunnar and Fürst, Carl Johan},
  issn         = {1527-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  publisher    = {American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {Communication and Trust in the Care Provided to a Dying Parent: A Nationwide Study of Cancer-Bereaved Youths.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2012.46.6102},
  doi          = {10.1200/JCO.2012.46.6102},
  year         = {2013},
}