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The radiation dose to children from X-ray examinations of the pelvis and the urinary tract

Almén, A LU and Mattsson, S LU (1995) In British Journal of Radiology 68(810). p.13-604
Abstract

X-ray examinations of the pelvis and the urinary tract are frequent examinations of children, in which a large part of the trunk is irradiated. The irradiated volume contains many of the most radiation sensitive organs and tissues. The absorbed dose to children during the examination was estimated from measurements with a dose-area product meter and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Entrance surface dose and the dose-area product results are presented. Conversion factors between the entrance surface dose and the organ dose were derived. The energy imparted, organ dose and effective dose were determined. The entrance surface dose for one single exposure varied between 0.32 mGy and 8.6 mGy for the urinary tract examination and between... (More)

X-ray examinations of the pelvis and the urinary tract are frequent examinations of children, in which a large part of the trunk is irradiated. The irradiated volume contains many of the most radiation sensitive organs and tissues. The absorbed dose to children during the examination was estimated from measurements with a dose-area product meter and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Entrance surface dose and the dose-area product results are presented. Conversion factors between the entrance surface dose and the organ dose were derived. The energy imparted, organ dose and effective dose were determined. The entrance surface dose for one single exposure varied between 0.32 mGy and 8.6 mGy for the urinary tract examination and between 0.26 mGy and 2.89 mGy per exposure for the pelvis examination. These variations are mainly influenced by the body size of the patient. The number of images taken during one examination varied. For the urinary tract investigation, the average number of exposures was six, while the corresponding number for the pelvis examination was two. The average effective dose for a typical urinary tract investigation ranged from 0.9 mSv to 8.5 mSv and from 0.3 mSv to 1.4 mSv for the pelvis examination. The radiation dose depends greatly on the body size. The recommendations to present the results in relation to age have been followed; however, the variation of body size even within each specified age range is significant. It is suggested that doses should be quoted in relation to a more critical parameter than age.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Energy Transfer, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Pelvis/diagnostic imaging, Radiation Dosage, Radiometry/methods, Sex Factors, Skin/radiation effects, Urography/methods
in
British Journal of Radiology
volume
68
issue
810
pages
10 pages
publisher
British Inst Radiology
external identifiers
  • scopus:0029006413
ISSN
0007-1285
DOI
10.1259/0007-1285-68-810-604
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
913714bd-207a-4009-a057-9220411d460c
date added to LUP
2018-06-16 21:13:12
date last changed
2018-06-24 05:23:15
@article{913714bd-207a-4009-a057-9220411d460c,
  abstract     = {<p>X-ray examinations of the pelvis and the urinary tract are frequent examinations of children, in which a large part of the trunk is irradiated. The irradiated volume contains many of the most radiation sensitive organs and tissues. The absorbed dose to children during the examination was estimated from measurements with a dose-area product meter and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Entrance surface dose and the dose-area product results are presented. Conversion factors between the entrance surface dose and the organ dose were derived. The energy imparted, organ dose and effective dose were determined. The entrance surface dose for one single exposure varied between 0.32 mGy and 8.6 mGy for the urinary tract examination and between 0.26 mGy and 2.89 mGy per exposure for the pelvis examination. These variations are mainly influenced by the body size of the patient. The number of images taken during one examination varied. For the urinary tract investigation, the average number of exposures was six, while the corresponding number for the pelvis examination was two. The average effective dose for a typical urinary tract investigation ranged from 0.9 mSv to 8.5 mSv and from 0.3 mSv to 1.4 mSv for the pelvis examination. The radiation dose depends greatly on the body size. The recommendations to present the results in relation to age have been followed; however, the variation of body size even within each specified age range is significant. It is suggested that doses should be quoted in relation to a more critical parameter than age.</p>},
  author       = {Almén, A and Mattsson, S},
  issn         = {0007-1285},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Age Factors,Child,Child, Preschool,Energy Transfer,Female,Humans,Infant,Infant, Newborn,Male,Pelvis/diagnostic imaging,Radiation Dosage,Radiometry/methods,Sex Factors,Skin/radiation effects,Urography/methods},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {810},
  pages        = {13--604},
  publisher    = {British Inst Radiology},
  series       = {British Journal of Radiology},
  title        = {The radiation dose to children from X-ray examinations of the pelvis and the urinary tract},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/0007-1285-68-810-604},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {1995},
}