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Preattentive bias for snake words in snake phobia?

Wikström, Jenny; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU ; Westerlund, Joakim and Högman, Lennart (2004) In Behaviour Research and Therapy 42(8). p.949-970
Abstract
Stroop interference and skin conductance responses (SCRs) for words related to snakes, spiders, flowers, and mushrooms were studied in a group of women (n=40) with snake phobia who were randomised to a stress or no-stress condition. The 21 low-stress snake phobics showed Stroop interference for unmasked (but not for masked) snake words, compared with 21 age- and sex-matched controls. Stroop interference was not significantly different between high-stress and low-stress snake phobics. No support for stronger SCRs for masked snake words was found in snake phobics in a lexical decision task with masked presentations of the same words. The lack of a masked Stroop interference in snake phobics suggests a possible difference in... (More)
Stroop interference and skin conductance responses (SCRs) for words related to snakes, spiders, flowers, and mushrooms were studied in a group of women (n=40) with snake phobia who were randomised to a stress or no-stress condition. The 21 low-stress snake phobics showed Stroop interference for unmasked (but not for masked) snake words, compared with 21 age- and sex-matched controls. Stroop interference was not significantly different between high-stress and low-stress snake phobics. No support for stronger SCRs for masked snake words was found in snake phobics in a lexical decision task with masked presentations of the same words. The lack of a masked Stroop interference in snake phobics suggests a possible difference in cognitive–emotional mechanisms underlying specific phobia vs. other anxiety disorders that deserves further investigation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Emotional Stroop task, Masked words, SCR, Specific phobia, Preattentive bias
in
Behaviour Research and Therapy
volume
42
issue
8
pages
949 - 970
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000222572500006
  • pmid:15178468
  • scopus:2642555380
ISSN
1873-622X
DOI
10.1016/j.brat.2003.07.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
62af2e28-e835-4d30-8cc4-5a6007cfb9d0 (old id 918359)
date added to LUP
2008-01-18 14:56:54
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:44:02
@article{62af2e28-e835-4d30-8cc4-5a6007cfb9d0,
  abstract     = {Stroop interference and skin conductance responses (SCRs) for words related to snakes, spiders, flowers, and mushrooms were studied in a group of women (n=40) with snake phobia who were randomised to a stress or no-stress condition. The 21 low-stress snake phobics showed Stroop interference for unmasked (but not for masked) snake words, compared with 21 age- and sex-matched controls. Stroop interference was not significantly different between high-stress and low-stress snake phobics. No support for stronger SCRs for masked snake words was found in snake phobics in a lexical decision task with masked presentations of the same words. The lack of a masked Stroop interference in snake phobics suggests a possible difference in cognitive–emotional mechanisms underlying specific phobia vs. other anxiety disorders that deserves further investigation.},
  author       = {Wikström, Jenny and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Westerlund, Joakim and Högman, Lennart},
  issn         = {1873-622X},
  keyword      = {Emotional Stroop task,Masked words,SCR,Specific phobia,Preattentive bias},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {949--970},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Behaviour Research and Therapy},
  title        = {Preattentive bias for snake words in snake phobia?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2003.07.002},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2004},
}