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Common measure of quality of life for people with systemic sclerosis across seven European countries : A cross-sectional study

Ndosi, Mwidimi ; Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya ; Allanore, Yannick ; Del Galdo, Francesco ; Frerix, Marc ; García-Díaz, Sílvia ; Hesselstrand, Roger LU ; Kendall, Christine ; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco and Mueller-Ladner, Ulf , et al. (2018) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 77(7). p.1032-1038
Abstract

Objectives the aim of this study was to adapt the Systemic Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (SScQoL) into six European cultures and validate it as a common measure of quality of life in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods this was a seven-country (Germany, France, Italy, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK) cross-sectional study. A forward–backward translation process was used to adapt the English SScQoL into target languages. SScQoL was completed by patients with SSc, then data were validated against the rasch model. to correct local response dependency, items were grouped into the following subscales: function, emotion, sleep, social and pain and reanalysed for fit to the model, unidimensionality and cross-cultural equivalence. results... (More)

Objectives the aim of this study was to adapt the Systemic Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (SScQoL) into six European cultures and validate it as a common measure of quality of life in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods this was a seven-country (Germany, France, Italy, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK) cross-sectional study. A forward–backward translation process was used to adapt the English SScQoL into target languages. SScQoL was completed by patients with SSc, then data were validated against the rasch model. to correct local response dependency, items were grouped into the following subscales: function, emotion, sleep, social and pain and reanalysed for fit to the model, unidimensionality and cross-cultural equivalence. results the adaptation of the SScQoL was seamless in all countries except Germany. Cross-cultural validation included 1080 patients with a mean age 58.0 years (Sd 13.9) and 87% were women. Local dependency was evident in individual country data. Grouping items into testlets corrected the local dependency in most country specific data. Fit to the model, reliability and unidimensionality was achieved in six-country data after cross-cultural adjustment for Italy in the social subscale. the SScQoL was then calibrated into an interval level scale. Conclusion the individual SScQoL items have translated well into five languages and overall, the scale maintained its construct validity, working well as a five-subscale questionnaire. Measures of quality of life in SSc can be directly compared across five countries (France, Poland Spain, Sweden and UK). data from Italy are also comparable with the other five countries although require an adjustment.

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Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
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77
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7 pages
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British Medical Association
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  • pmid:29463517
  • scopus:85055488043
ISSN
0003-4967
DOI
10.1136/annrheumdis-2017-212412
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English
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yes
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91ccec88-5d5d-452d-bda5-5d7cb770c16f
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2018-11-19 11:44:51
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2020-01-16 03:37:42
@article{91ccec88-5d5d-452d-bda5-5d7cb770c16f,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives the aim of this study was to adapt the Systemic Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (SScQoL) into six European cultures and validate it as a common measure of quality of life in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods this was a seven-country (Germany, France, Italy, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK) cross-sectional study. A forward–backward translation process was used to adapt the English SScQoL into target languages. SScQoL was completed by patients with SSc, then data were validated against the rasch model. to correct local response dependency, items were grouped into the following subscales: function, emotion, sleep, social and pain and reanalysed for fit to the model, unidimensionality and cross-cultural equivalence. results the adaptation of the SScQoL was seamless in all countries except Germany. Cross-cultural validation included 1080 patients with a mean age 58.0 years (Sd 13.9) and 87% were women. Local dependency was evident in individual country data. Grouping items into testlets corrected the local dependency in most country specific data. Fit to the model, reliability and unidimensionality was achieved in six-country data after cross-cultural adjustment for Italy in the social subscale. the SScQoL was then calibrated into an interval level scale. Conclusion the individual SScQoL items have translated well into five languages and overall, the scale maintained its construct validity, working well as a five-subscale questionnaire. Measures of quality of life in SSc can be directly compared across five countries (France, Poland Spain, Sweden and UK). data from Italy are also comparable with the other five countries although require an adjustment.</p>},
  author       = {Ndosi, Mwidimi and Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya and Allanore, Yannick and Del Galdo, Francesco and Frerix, Marc and García-Díaz, Sílvia and Hesselstrand, Roger and Kendall, Christine and Matucci-Cerinic, Marco and Mueller-Ladner, Ulf and Sandqvist, Gunnel and Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç and Schmeiser, Tim and Sierakowska, Matylda and Sierakowska, Justyna and Sierakowski, Stanslaw and Redmond, Anthony},
  issn         = {0003-4967},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1032--1038},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Common measure of quality of life for people with systemic sclerosis across seven European countries : A cross-sectional study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2017-212412},
  doi          = {10.1136/annrheumdis-2017-212412},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2018},
}