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Domain decomposition in acoustic and structure–acoustic analysis

Sandberg, Göran LU ; Hansson, Per LU and Gustavsson, Mats LU (2001) In Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 190(24-25). p.2979-2988
Abstract
Finite element analysis in acoustics, structure–acoustics, and structure–hydroacoustic engineering applications leads to large systems of equations, and is still a challenge to current high-performance computer systems. The demands for extremely large models are due to large physical domains or the desire to resolve high-frequency levels, at least as long as the different modes are separated, say to 500 Hz. This obviously calls for small elements. It is therefore of great interest to have procedures for domain splitting, fluid–structure and fluid–fluid, thus splitting the analysis procedure into smaller problems. Use of multiple processing also lies down the road. Furthermore changes in design often affect only part of the geometry, thus,... (More)
Finite element analysis in acoustics, structure–acoustics, and structure–hydroacoustic engineering applications leads to large systems of equations, and is still a challenge to current high-performance computer systems. The demands for extremely large models are due to large physical domains or the desire to resolve high-frequency levels, at least as long as the different modes are separated, say to 500 Hz. This obviously calls for small elements. It is therefore of great interest to have procedures for domain splitting, fluid–structure and fluid–fluid, thus splitting the analysis procedure into smaller problems. Use of multiple processing also lies down the road. Furthermore changes in design often affect only part of the geometry, thus, only that particular domain needs to be recalculated, for instance in the case of sound quality engineering. The interest and efforts put into numerical methods related to fluid–structure interaction are still spreading. This applies both to engineering application studies and applied mathematical issues related to the topic. Thorough investigations of issues of basic nature can be found in the literature [Harari et al., Arch. Comput. Meth. Eng. 3 (2–3) (1996) 131–309; H. Morand, R. Ohayon, Fluid Structure Interaction, Wiley, 1995]. A reduction procedure of the structure and multiple fluid domains is exercised. The coupled problem is formulated as a symmetric standard problem. A subsequent analysis in the time domain can be performed on a subset of the eigenmodes. The selection of participating modes can be made on the basis of the information provided by the coupling characteristics. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Finite element, Domain decomposition, Fluid–structure interaction
in
Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
volume
190
issue
24-25
pages
2979 - 2988
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0035793733
ISSN
0045-7825
DOI
10.1016/S0045-7825(00)00377-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01191ca0-cfc4-4298-84dd-d4f11a0c4678 (old id 928497)
date added to LUP
2010-10-23 10:21:18
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:17:59
@article{01191ca0-cfc4-4298-84dd-d4f11a0c4678,
  abstract     = {Finite element analysis in acoustics, structure–acoustics, and structure–hydroacoustic engineering applications leads to large systems of equations, and is still a challenge to current high-performance computer systems. The demands for extremely large models are due to large physical domains or the desire to resolve high-frequency levels, at least as long as the different modes are separated, say to 500 Hz. This obviously calls for small elements. It is therefore of great interest to have procedures for domain splitting, fluid–structure and fluid–fluid, thus splitting the analysis procedure into smaller problems. Use of multiple processing also lies down the road. Furthermore changes in design often affect only part of the geometry, thus, only that particular domain needs to be recalculated, for instance in the case of sound quality engineering. The interest and efforts put into numerical methods related to fluid–structure interaction are still spreading. This applies both to engineering application studies and applied mathematical issues related to the topic. Thorough investigations of issues of basic nature can be found in the literature [Harari et al., Arch. Comput. Meth. Eng. 3 (2–3) (1996) 131–309; H. Morand, R. Ohayon, Fluid Structure Interaction, Wiley, 1995]. A reduction procedure of the structure and multiple fluid domains is exercised. The coupled problem is formulated as a symmetric standard problem. A subsequent analysis in the time domain can be performed on a subset of the eigenmodes. The selection of participating modes can be made on the basis of the information provided by the coupling characteristics.},
  author       = {Sandberg, Göran and Hansson, Per and Gustavsson, Mats},
  issn         = {0045-7825},
  keyword      = {Finite element,Domain decomposition,Fluid–structure interaction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {24-25},
  pages        = {2979--2988},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering},
  title        = {Domain decomposition in acoustic and structure–acoustic analysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0045-7825(00)00377-7},
  volume       = {190},
  year         = {2001},
}