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Military observers’ reactions and performance when facing danger

Wallenius, Claes; Larsson, G and Johansson, Curt R LU (2004) In Military Psychology 16(4). p.211-229
Abstract
Some groups have to face threats and dangers professionally with maintained cognitive functioning, which implies a need to know both the extent to which maladaptive reactions occur and the factors that may affect it. This study examines self-reported reactions and performance when facing risks and dangers on peacekeeping observer missions. The sample consisted of 154 military observers.,A self-made questionnaire, including the General Health Questionnaire and the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, was used. We found that feelings of invulnerability were common in relation to mission risks. In a specific danger incident, most participants subjectively performed well, although partial loss of cognitive functioning was reported in half of the... (More)
Some groups have to face threats and dangers professionally with maintained cognitive functioning, which implies a need to know both the extent to which maladaptive reactions occur and the factors that may affect it. This study examines self-reported reactions and performance when facing risks and dangers on peacekeeping observer missions. The sample consisted of 154 military observers.,A self-made questionnaire, including the General Health Questionnaire and the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, was used. We found that feelings of invulnerability were common in relation to mission risks. In a specific danger incident, most participants subjectively performed well, although partial loss of cognitive functioning was reported in half of the cases and severely dysfunctional reactions in about one tenth. Cluster. analysis showed that self-reported cognitive limitations in danger incidents were related to 2 factors: complicating situational factors, such as high levels of threat, complex decision demands, and minor control possibilities; and individual vulnerability factors, such as general worry and anger, low SOC, anxiety, and psychosomatic symptoms. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Military Psychology
volume
16
issue
4
pages
211 - 229
publisher
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
external identifiers
  • wos:000225373000001
  • scopus:11144343239
ISSN
0899-5605
DOI
10.1207/s15327876mp1604_1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0993703b-d065-4362-8e64-85ca1d1b6241 (old id 933926)
date added to LUP
2008-01-18 14:51:50
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:36:03
@article{0993703b-d065-4362-8e64-85ca1d1b6241,
  abstract     = {Some groups have to face threats and dangers professionally with maintained cognitive functioning, which implies a need to know both the extent to which maladaptive reactions occur and the factors that may affect it. This study examines self-reported reactions and performance when facing risks and dangers on peacekeeping observer missions. The sample consisted of 154 military observers.,A self-made questionnaire, including the General Health Questionnaire and the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, was used. We found that feelings of invulnerability were common in relation to mission risks. In a specific danger incident, most participants subjectively performed well, although partial loss of cognitive functioning was reported in half of the cases and severely dysfunctional reactions in about one tenth. Cluster. analysis showed that self-reported cognitive limitations in danger incidents were related to 2 factors: complicating situational factors, such as high levels of threat, complex decision demands, and minor control possibilities; and individual vulnerability factors, such as general worry and anger, low SOC, anxiety, and psychosomatic symptoms.},
  author       = {Wallenius, Claes and Larsson, G and Johansson, Curt R},
  issn         = {0899-5605},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {211--229},
  publisher    = {Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
  series       = {Military Psychology},
  title        = {Military observers’ reactions and performance when facing danger},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327876mp1604_1},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2004},
}