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Influences of Family Based Prerequisites, Reading Attitude, and Self-Regulation on Reading Ability

Swalander, Lena LU and Taube, Karin (2007) In Contemporary Educational Psychology 32(2). p.206-230
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of self-regulated learning, as indicated by academic self-concept, motivation and learning strategies, reading attitude and family based prerequisites on reading ability. Students (n=4018) in the eighth grade answered the IEA reading literacy test, the self-regulated learning questionnaire and a student questionnaire about their background. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed that the self-regulated learning questionnaire did not measure the intended three dimensions, but only two: Verbal/General academic self-concept and a new dimension called Goal oriented strategies. Structural Equation Modelling ("SEM") with a cross-validation sample was conducted to determine the effects in the final... (More)
This study investigated the effect of self-regulated learning, as indicated by academic self-concept, motivation and learning strategies, reading attitude and family based prerequisites on reading ability. Students (n=4018) in the eighth grade answered the IEA reading literacy test, the self-regulated learning questionnaire and a student questionnaire about their background. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed that the self-regulated learning questionnaire did not measure the intended three dimensions, but only two: Verbal/General academic self-concept and a new dimension called Goal oriented strategies. Structural Equation Modelling ("SEM") with a cross-validation sample was conducted to determine the effects in the final model. The strongest effect on reading ability was from Verbal/General academic self-concept (beta=0.43 for final and beta=0.56 for cross-validation model). Gender differences revealed that girls read better on narrative and expository texts, had a more positive reading attitude, and more positive verbal self-concept, whereas boys had a higher academic self-concept (not domain-specific), self-efficacy, control expectation, reported more memorising, elaboration, and instrumental motivation (all differences p less than 0.001). (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Grade 8, Questionnaires, Self Efficacy, Family Influence, Secondary Education, Student Attitudes, Goal Orientation, Structural Equation Models, Reading Tests, Learner Controlled Instruction, Self Concept, Student Motivation, Factor Analysis, Gender Differences, Learning Strategies, Prerequisites, Reading Attitudes, Reading Ability
in
Contemporary Educational Psychology
volume
32
issue
2
pages
206 - 230
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:33947598890
ISSN
0361-476X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6536a918-faaa-4a5b-a996-7a6c7cf90c3a (old id 935582)
date added to LUP
2008-02-04 11:04:42
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:34:54
@article{6536a918-faaa-4a5b-a996-7a6c7cf90c3a,
  abstract     = {This study investigated the effect of self-regulated learning, as indicated by academic self-concept, motivation and learning strategies, reading attitude and family based prerequisites on reading ability. Students (n=4018) in the eighth grade answered the IEA reading literacy test, the self-regulated learning questionnaire and a student questionnaire about their background. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed that the self-regulated learning questionnaire did not measure the intended three dimensions, but only two: Verbal/General academic self-concept and a new dimension called Goal oriented strategies. Structural Equation Modelling ("SEM") with a cross-validation sample was conducted to determine the effects in the final model. The strongest effect on reading ability was from Verbal/General academic self-concept (beta=0.43 for final and beta=0.56 for cross-validation model). Gender differences revealed that girls read better on narrative and expository texts, had a more positive reading attitude, and more positive verbal self-concept, whereas boys had a higher academic self-concept (not domain-specific), self-efficacy, control expectation, reported more memorising, elaboration, and instrumental motivation (all differences p less than 0.001).},
  author       = {Swalander, Lena and Taube, Karin},
  issn         = {0361-476X},
  keyword      = {Grade 8,Questionnaires,Self Efficacy,Family Influence,Secondary Education,Student Attitudes,Goal Orientation,Structural Equation Models,Reading Tests,Learner Controlled Instruction,Self Concept,Student Motivation,Factor Analysis,Gender Differences,Learning Strategies,Prerequisites,Reading Attitudes,Reading Ability},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {206--230},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Contemporary Educational Psychology},
  title        = {Influences of Family Based Prerequisites, Reading Attitude, and Self-Regulation on Reading Ability},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2007},
}