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Factors associated with young children’s self-perceived physical competence and self-reported physical activity.

Sollerhed, Ann-Christin LU ; Apitzsch, Erwin LU ; Råstam, Lennart LU and Ejlertsson, G (2008) In Health Education Research 23(1). p.125-136
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with self-reported physical activity (PA), self-perceived physical fitness and competence in physical education (PE) among young children. The study included physical tests, anthropometric measures and a questionnaire. The study group comprised 206 children (114 boys and 92 girls, aged 8–12 years). Positive Odds Ratio was used in the logistic regression analyses. High level of self-reported PA was associated with membership of sport clubs and high self-perceived physical fitness. Variables associated with high self-perceived competence in PE were low age, high physical performance, living with both parents, high self-perceived physical fitness, male gender and enjoying PE. Variables... (More)
The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with self-reported physical activity (PA), self-perceived physical fitness and competence in physical education (PE) among young children. The study included physical tests, anthropometric measures and a questionnaire. The study group comprised 206 children (114 boys and 92 girls, aged 8–12 years). Positive Odds Ratio was used in the logistic regression analyses. High level of self-reported PA was associated with membership of sport clubs and high self-perceived physical fitness. Variables associated with high self-perceived competence in PE were low age, high physical performance, living with both parents, high self-perceived physical fitness, male gender and enjoying PE. Variables associated with high self-perceived physical fitness were low age, high performance in endurance running, high self-reported PA, positive self-perceived body function and high self-perceived competence in PE. Correlations between children's self-perceived competence in PE and actual measured physical performance, between the self-perceived fitness and endurance performance and between self-reported PA and physical performance could be seen as a form of concurrent validity. One implication of the study for practitioners might be that children's own perceptions of their physical competence and activity levels could be used to roughly identify groups of children who are at risk of remaining physically inactive and therefore more prone to be unhealthy. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Health Education Research
volume
23
issue
1
pages
125 - 136
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000252543600012
  • scopus:38349149340
ISSN
0268-1153
DOI
10.1093/her/cym010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
302d47d5-a6c0-45c8-97ae-3cf9eac0b5f2 (old id 939467)
date added to LUP
2008-01-29 14:23:13
date last changed
2017-09-03 04:05:12
@article{302d47d5-a6c0-45c8-97ae-3cf9eac0b5f2,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with self-reported physical activity (PA), self-perceived physical fitness and competence in physical education (PE) among young children. The study included physical tests, anthropometric measures and a questionnaire. The study group comprised 206 children (114 boys and 92 girls, aged 8–12 years). Positive Odds Ratio was used in the logistic regression analyses. High level of self-reported PA was associated with membership of sport clubs and high self-perceived physical fitness. Variables associated with high self-perceived competence in PE were low age, high physical performance, living with both parents, high self-perceived physical fitness, male gender and enjoying PE. Variables associated with high self-perceived physical fitness were low age, high performance in endurance running, high self-reported PA, positive self-perceived body function and high self-perceived competence in PE. Correlations between children's self-perceived competence in PE and actual measured physical performance, between the self-perceived fitness and endurance performance and between self-reported PA and physical performance could be seen as a form of concurrent validity. One implication of the study for practitioners might be that children's own perceptions of their physical competence and activity levels could be used to roughly identify groups of children who are at risk of remaining physically inactive and therefore more prone to be unhealthy.},
  author       = {Sollerhed, Ann-Christin and Apitzsch, Erwin and Råstam, Lennart and Ejlertsson, G},
  issn         = {0268-1153},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {125--136},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Health Education Research},
  title        = {Factors associated with young children’s self-perceived physical competence and self-reported physical activity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cym010},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2008},
}