Advanced

A developmental model for alcohol use disorders in Swedish men

Kendler, K. S. LU ; Ohlsson, H. LU ; Edwards, A. C.; Sundquist, J. LU and Sundquist, K. LU (2016) In Psychological Medicine 46(13). p.2759-2770
Abstract

Background: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a classic multifactorial syndrome and it is critical to understand the diversity of the relevant risk factors and how they inter-relate over development. Method: We examined 21 risk factors for AUD in four developmental tiers reflecting (i) birth, (ii) childhood and early adolescence, (iii) late adolescence, and (iv) early adulthood in 47 414 Swedish men of whom 3907 (8.2%) were registered for AUD at or after age 25 with a mean length of follow-up of 33.9 (6.6) years. Structural equational model fitting was performed using Mplus. Results: The best-fitting model provided a good fit to the data and explained 23.4% of the variance in AUD. The five strongest predictors were: externalizing behaviors,... (More)

Background: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a classic multifactorial syndrome and it is critical to understand the diversity of the relevant risk factors and how they inter-relate over development. Method: We examined 21 risk factors for AUD in four developmental tiers reflecting (i) birth, (ii) childhood and early adolescence, (iii) late adolescence, and (iv) early adulthood in 47 414 Swedish men of whom 3907 (8.2%) were registered for AUD at or after age 25 with a mean length of follow-up of 33.9 (6.6) years. Structural equational model fitting was performed using Mplus. Results: The best-fitting model provided a good fit to the data and explained 23.4% of the variance in AUD. The five strongest predictors were: externalizing behaviors, criminal behavior, father's alcohol consumption, genetic risk, and low educational attainment. Two developmentally early familial/genetic risk factors had substantial direct paths to AUD: father's alcohol consumption and genetic liability. Other broad developmental pathways to risk for AUD were evident: externalizing, psychosocial and internalizing. Overall, the externalizing pathway to AUD was the strongest. However, these pathways were substantially interwoven over time such that risk factors from one domain were commonly predicted by and/or predicted risk factors from the other broad domains of risk. Conclusion: AUD in men is an etiologically complex syndrome influenced by familial-genetic, psychosocial, internalizing, and especially externalizing risk factors that act and interact over development and have complicated mediational pathways.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alcohol use disorder, development, environment, path models, personality
in
Psychological Medicine
volume
46
issue
13
pages
12 pages
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84979284937
  • wos:000385358000008
ISSN
0033-2917
DOI
10.1017/S0033291716001409
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
94b237c0-852b-4ff8-a542-01c0299f8cde
date added to LUP
2016-08-15 12:24:14
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:31:38
@article{94b237c0-852b-4ff8-a542-01c0299f8cde,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a classic multifactorial syndrome and it is critical to understand the diversity of the relevant risk factors and how they inter-relate over development. Method: We examined 21 risk factors for AUD in four developmental tiers reflecting (i) birth, (ii) childhood and early adolescence, (iii) late adolescence, and (iv) early adulthood in 47 414 Swedish men of whom 3907 (8.2%) were registered for AUD at or after age 25 with a mean length of follow-up of 33.9 (6.6) years. Structural equational model fitting was performed using Mplus. Results: The best-fitting model provided a good fit to the data and explained 23.4% of the variance in AUD. The five strongest predictors were: externalizing behaviors, criminal behavior, father's alcohol consumption, genetic risk, and low educational attainment. Two developmentally early familial/genetic risk factors had substantial direct paths to AUD: father's alcohol consumption and genetic liability. Other broad developmental pathways to risk for AUD were evident: externalizing, psychosocial and internalizing. Overall, the externalizing pathway to AUD was the strongest. However, these pathways were substantially interwoven over time such that risk factors from one domain were commonly predicted by and/or predicted risk factors from the other broad domains of risk. Conclusion: AUD in men is an etiologically complex syndrome influenced by familial-genetic, psychosocial, internalizing, and especially externalizing risk factors that act and interact over development and have complicated mediational pathways.</p>},
  author       = {Kendler, K. S. and Ohlsson, H. and Edwards, A. C. and Sundquist, J. and Sundquist, K.},
  issn         = {0033-2917},
  keyword      = {Alcohol use disorder,development,environment,path models,personality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {2759--2770},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Psychological Medicine},
  title        = {A developmental model for alcohol use disorders in Swedish men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291716001409},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2016},
}