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Bacterial and fungal response to nitrogen fertilization in three coniferous forest soils

Demoling, Fredrik LU ; Nilsson, Lars Ola LU and Bååth, Erland LU (2008) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 40(2). p.370-379
Abstract
Forest soil carbon (C) pools may act as sinks for, or sources of, atmospheric carbon dioxide, while nitrogen (N) fertilization may affect the net exchange of C in forest ecosystems. Since all major C and N processes in soil are driven by soil microorganisms, we evaluated the effects of N fertilization on biomass and bacterial and fungal activity in soils from three Norway spruce forests with different climatic and N availability conditions. N deposition and net N mineralization were higher at the sites in southern Sweden than at the site in northern Sweden. We also studied the extent to which N fertilization altered the nutrient(s) limiting bacterial growth in soil. We found that on average microbial biomass was reduced by similar to 40%... (More)
Forest soil carbon (C) pools may act as sinks for, or sources of, atmospheric carbon dioxide, while nitrogen (N) fertilization may affect the net exchange of C in forest ecosystems. Since all major C and N processes in soil are driven by soil microorganisms, we evaluated the effects of N fertilization on biomass and bacterial and fungal activity in soils from three Norway spruce forests with different climatic and N availability conditions. N deposition and net N mineralization were higher at the sites in southern Sweden than at the site in northern Sweden. We also studied the extent to which N fertilization altered the nutrient(s) limiting bacterial growth in soil. We found that on average microbial biomass was reduced by similar to 40% and microbial activity by similar to 30% in fertilized plots. Bacterial growth rates were more negatively affected by fertilization than fungal growth rates, while fungal biomass (estimated using the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) 18:2 omega 6,9) decreased more than bacterial biomass as a consequence of fertilization. The microbial community structure (indicated by the PLFA pattern) was changed by fertilization, but not in the same way at the three sites. Soil bacteria were limited by a lack of carbon in all forests, with the carbon limitation becoming more evident in fertilized plots, especially in the forests that had previously been the most N-limited ones. This study thus showed that the effects of N fertilization differed depending on the conditions at the site prior to fertilization. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
PLFA, limiting nutrient, nitrogen, fertilization, coniferous forest soil, fungi, bacteria
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
40
issue
2
pages
370 - 379
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000251655800010
  • scopus:36048936654
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2007.08.019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d711042-d9c1-4006-9a11-b39e8e69b95f (old id 965789)
date added to LUP
2009-07-08 16:11:38
date last changed
2017-09-17 05:56:05
@article{4d711042-d9c1-4006-9a11-b39e8e69b95f,
  abstract     = {Forest soil carbon (C) pools may act as sinks for, or sources of, atmospheric carbon dioxide, while nitrogen (N) fertilization may affect the net exchange of C in forest ecosystems. Since all major C and N processes in soil are driven by soil microorganisms, we evaluated the effects of N fertilization on biomass and bacterial and fungal activity in soils from three Norway spruce forests with different climatic and N availability conditions. N deposition and net N mineralization were higher at the sites in southern Sweden than at the site in northern Sweden. We also studied the extent to which N fertilization altered the nutrient(s) limiting bacterial growth in soil. We found that on average microbial biomass was reduced by similar to 40% and microbial activity by similar to 30% in fertilized plots. Bacterial growth rates were more negatively affected by fertilization than fungal growth rates, while fungal biomass (estimated using the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) 18:2 omega 6,9) decreased more than bacterial biomass as a consequence of fertilization. The microbial community structure (indicated by the PLFA pattern) was changed by fertilization, but not in the same way at the three sites. Soil bacteria were limited by a lack of carbon in all forests, with the carbon limitation becoming more evident in fertilized plots, especially in the forests that had previously been the most N-limited ones. This study thus showed that the effects of N fertilization differed depending on the conditions at the site prior to fertilization. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Demoling, Fredrik and Nilsson, Lars Ola and Bååth, Erland},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {PLFA,limiting nutrient,nitrogen,fertilization,coniferous forest soil,fungi,bacteria},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {370--379},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Bacterial and fungal response to nitrogen fertilization in three coniferous forest soils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2007.08.019},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2008},
}