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Delivery outcome in relation to maternal use of some recently introduced antidepressants

Lennestal, Roland and Källén, Bengt LU (2007) In Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 27(6). p.607-613
Abstract
Little is known concerning possible hazards of maternal use of the recently introduced antidepressant drugs with noradrenergic and varying serotonergic activity (serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor [SNRI]/noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor [NRI] drugs). Using the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 732 women who had used SNRI/NRI drugs in early pregnancy. Maternal characteristics were studied as well as delivery outcome: pregnancy duration, birth weight, neonatal diagnoses, infant deaths, and congenital malformations. Comparisons were made with all deliveries in the population (n = 860,215) after adjustment for identified confounders, and risks were expressed as odds ratios or (when numbers were low) as risk ratios. Women... (More)
Little is known concerning possible hazards of maternal use of the recently introduced antidepressant drugs with noradrenergic and varying serotonergic activity (serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor [SNRI]/noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor [NRI] drugs). Using the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 732 women who had used SNRI/NRI drugs in early pregnancy. Maternal characteristics were studied as well as delivery outcome: pregnancy duration, birth weight, neonatal diagnoses, infant deaths, and congenital malformations. Comparisons were made with all deliveries in the population (n = 860,215) after adjustment for identified confounders, and risks were expressed as odds ratios or (when numbers were low) as risk ratios. Women using SNRI/NRI deviated from other women by being older, more often having their first infant, being more extensive smokers, having a higher body mass index, and more often being born within Sweden. These characteristics, like the pattern of concomitant drug use, resembled much those of women using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs. The rate of preterm births was significantly increased (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.15), and neonatal symptoms such as respiratory problems, low Apgar score, hypoglycemia, and neonatal convulsions showed a similar pattern as seen after maternal SSRI treatment. We found no increased risk for stillbirths or congenital malformations. Delivery outcome after exposure to SNRI/NRI drugs resembles much what has been described after use of SSRI drugs. No signs of teratogenicity were found. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
volume
27
issue
6
pages
607 - 613
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000251181600009
  • scopus:39649092992
ISSN
0271-0749
DOI
10.1097/jcp.0b013e31815ac4d2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01df4615-02a9-43ab-b305-3b4da419b31f (old id 968845)
alternative location
http://www.psychopharmacology.com/pt/re/jclnpsychopharm/abstract.00004714-200712000-00009.htm
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 08:53:44
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:21:25
@article{01df4615-02a9-43ab-b305-3b4da419b31f,
  abstract     = {Little is known concerning possible hazards of maternal use of the recently introduced antidepressant drugs with noradrenergic and varying serotonergic activity (serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor [SNRI]/noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor [NRI] drugs). Using the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 732 women who had used SNRI/NRI drugs in early pregnancy. Maternal characteristics were studied as well as delivery outcome: pregnancy duration, birth weight, neonatal diagnoses, infant deaths, and congenital malformations. Comparisons were made with all deliveries in the population (n = 860,215) after adjustment for identified confounders, and risks were expressed as odds ratios or (when numbers were low) as risk ratios. Women using SNRI/NRI deviated from other women by being older, more often having their first infant, being more extensive smokers, having a higher body mass index, and more often being born within Sweden. These characteristics, like the pattern of concomitant drug use, resembled much those of women using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs. The rate of preterm births was significantly increased (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.15), and neonatal symptoms such as respiratory problems, low Apgar score, hypoglycemia, and neonatal convulsions showed a similar pattern as seen after maternal SSRI treatment. We found no increased risk for stillbirths or congenital malformations. Delivery outcome after exposure to SNRI/NRI drugs resembles much what has been described after use of SSRI drugs. No signs of teratogenicity were found.},
  author       = {Lennestal, Roland and Källén, Bengt},
  issn         = {0271-0749},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {607--613},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology},
  title        = {Delivery outcome in relation to maternal use of some recently introduced antidepressants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/jcp.0b013e31815ac4d2},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2007},
}