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Dysphagia and dysmotility of the pharynx and oesophagus in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome

Mandl, Thomas LU ; Ekberg, Olle LU ; Wollmer, Per LU ; Manthorpe, Rolf LU and Jacobsson, Lennart LU (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 36(5). p.394-401
Abstract
Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms and dysmotility in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome ( pSS) and relate these to autonomic nervous function. Methods: Twenty consecutive pSS patients, according to the American - European Consensus Criteria ( AECC), and 30 age- and sex- matched controls from the Swedish general population registry were studied. All subjects completed a pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms questionnaire and were examined by pharyngeal and oesophageal video radiography. In addition, the pSS patients were examined by two different autonomic nervous function tests, the deep breathing test [ calculating the expiration/ inspiration ( E/ I) ratio] and the finger skin blood flow test... (More)
Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms and dysmotility in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome ( pSS) and relate these to autonomic nervous function. Methods: Twenty consecutive pSS patients, according to the American - European Consensus Criteria ( AECC), and 30 age- and sex- matched controls from the Swedish general population registry were studied. All subjects completed a pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms questionnaire and were examined by pharyngeal and oesophageal video radiography. In addition, the pSS patients were examined by two different autonomic nervous function tests, the deep breathing test [ calculating the expiration/ inspiration ( E/ I) ratio] and the finger skin blood flow test [ the vasoconstriction ( VAC) index]. Results: pSS patients experienced significantly more dysphagia compared with controls ( 65% vs. 3%; p < 0.001). Pharyngeal ( 45% vs. 7%; p < 0.01), oesophageal ( 80% vs. 7%; p < 0.001) and gastro- oesophageal reflux symptoms ( 60% vs. 23%; p < 0.01) were also more prevalent in pSS patients compared with controls while pharyngeal ( 15% vs. 17%; p=NS) and oesophageal dysmotility ( 40% vs. 30%; p=NS) were not. Dysphagia was not associated with dysmotility but was found to be associated with a decreased E/ I ratio [ -1.05 ( -1.51 to -0.40) in patients with dysphagia vs. -0.21 ( -0.39 to 0.65) in patients without dysphagia; p < 0.01]. Conclusion: Subjective swallowing difficulties were more common in pSS patients than in controls while objective signs of pharyngeal and oesophageal dysmotility were not. Dysphagia in pSS patients does not seem to be related to video radiographical signs of dysmotility but may be related to an impaired parasympathetic function. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
36
issue
5
pages
394 - 401
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000250715400011
  • scopus:35649026407
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.1080/03009740701607638
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
41aa32cf-8f62-48b9-bb80-f2c7d03fb590 (old id 972390)
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 13:10:03
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:33:07
@article{41aa32cf-8f62-48b9-bb80-f2c7d03fb590,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms and dysmotility in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome ( pSS) and relate these to autonomic nervous function. Methods: Twenty consecutive pSS patients, according to the American - European Consensus Criteria ( AECC), and 30 age- and sex- matched controls from the Swedish general population registry were studied. All subjects completed a pharyngeal and oesophageal symptoms questionnaire and were examined by pharyngeal and oesophageal video radiography. In addition, the pSS patients were examined by two different autonomic nervous function tests, the deep breathing test [ calculating the expiration/ inspiration ( E/ I) ratio] and the finger skin blood flow test [ the vasoconstriction ( VAC) index]. Results: pSS patients experienced significantly more dysphagia compared with controls ( 65% vs. 3%; p &lt; 0.001). Pharyngeal ( 45% vs. 7%; p &lt; 0.01), oesophageal ( 80% vs. 7%; p &lt; 0.001) and gastro- oesophageal reflux symptoms ( 60% vs. 23%; p &lt; 0.01) were also more prevalent in pSS patients compared with controls while pharyngeal ( 15% vs. 17%; p=NS) and oesophageal dysmotility ( 40% vs. 30%; p=NS) were not. Dysphagia was not associated with dysmotility but was found to be associated with a decreased E/ I ratio [ -1.05 ( -1.51 to -0.40) in patients with dysphagia vs. -0.21 ( -0.39 to 0.65) in patients without dysphagia; p &lt; 0.01]. Conclusion: Subjective swallowing difficulties were more common in pSS patients than in controls while objective signs of pharyngeal and oesophageal dysmotility were not. Dysphagia in pSS patients does not seem to be related to video radiographical signs of dysmotility but may be related to an impaired parasympathetic function.},
  author       = {Mandl, Thomas and Ekberg, Olle and Wollmer, Per and Manthorpe, Rolf and Jacobsson, Lennart},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {394--401},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Dysphagia and dysmotility of the pharynx and oesophagus in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03009740701607638},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2007},
}