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Organising habilitation services: Team structures and family participation

Larsson, Magnus LU (2000) In Child Care Health and Development 26(6). p.501-514
Abstract
Summary

This study is part of a project focusing on co-operation between receivers of habilitation services (families) and professionals. The study focuses on the organisation and co-ordination of the services, and compares two structures for their accomplishment. The first is the typical multiprofessional habilitation team (MHT), and the second is the individualised team (ISP). MHT teams are organised within the habilitation agency, while ISP teams span institutional boundaries. An ISP team is formed around the individual child who receives services from the habilitation centre, and includes parents (sometimes the child), professionals from the habilitation centre, and professionals from other service-providing institutions that... (More)
Summary

This study is part of a project focusing on co-operation between receivers of habilitation services (families) and professionals. The study focuses on the organisation and co-ordination of the services, and compares two structures for their accomplishment. The first is the typical multiprofessional habilitation team (MHT), and the second is the individualised team (ISP). MHT teams are organised within the habilitation agency, while ISP teams span institutional boundaries. An ISP team is formed around the individual child who receives services from the habilitation centre, and includes parents (sometimes the child), professionals from the habilitation centre, and professionals from other service-providing institutions that are actively involved (for instance pre-school teacher, schoolteacher etc.). The team maps child and family needs, organises assessments and services and formulates goals that subsequently are monitored and followed up. A questionnaire (Measures of Processes of Care) was used to assess the experiences of 385 service receivers. The questionnaire focuses on service receivers' experiences of the family-centredness of the service, operationalised in 56 items, along with five items concerning perceptions of level of control over service provision. The experiences of families having individualised teams were compared to those not having these teams. Significant differences were obtained, suggesting the impact of the form of service organisation on the content. Families having ISP teams report both more family-centred service, and a greater level of control over service provision. Results are discussed in terms of organising structures and co-ordination of services, and in terms of family participation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Child Care Health and Development
volume
26
issue
6
pages
501 - 514
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034330604
ISSN
1365-2214
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2214.2000.00169.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
696b2386-3ee9-4594-aba7-76d981c2b94f (old id 978799)
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 16:06:30
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:07:34
@article{696b2386-3ee9-4594-aba7-76d981c2b94f,
  abstract     = {Summary<br/><br>
This study is part of a project focusing on co-operation between receivers of habilitation services (families) and professionals. The study focuses on the organisation and co-ordination of the services, and compares two structures for their accomplishment. The first is the typical multiprofessional habilitation team (MHT), and the second is the individualised team (ISP). MHT teams are organised within the habilitation agency, while ISP teams span institutional boundaries. An ISP team is formed around the individual child who receives services from the habilitation centre, and includes parents (sometimes the child), professionals from the habilitation centre, and professionals from other service-providing institutions that are actively involved (for instance pre-school teacher, schoolteacher etc.). The team maps child and family needs, organises assessments and services and formulates goals that subsequently are monitored and followed up. A questionnaire (Measures of Processes of Care) was used to assess the experiences of 385 service receivers. The questionnaire focuses on service receivers' experiences of the family-centredness of the service, operationalised in 56 items, along with five items concerning perceptions of level of control over service provision. The experiences of families having individualised teams were compared to those not having these teams. Significant differences were obtained, suggesting the impact of the form of service organisation on the content. Families having ISP teams report both more family-centred service, and a greater level of control over service provision. Results are discussed in terms of organising structures and co-ordination of services, and in terms of family participation.},
  author       = {Larsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1365-2214},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {501--514},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Child Care Health and Development},
  title        = {Organising habilitation services: Team structures and family participation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2214.2000.00169.x},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2000},
}