Advanced

Interstitial laser thermotherapy of adenocarcinoma transplanted into rat liver

Möller, Páll H. LU ; Ivarsson, Kjell LU ; Stenram, Unne LU ; Radnell, Monica and Tranberg, Karl Göran LU (1997) In European Journal of Surgery 163(11). p.861-870
Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of different temperatures and exposure times in interstitial laser thermotherapy. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Material: 48 male Wistar FU rats with dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma transplanted into the liver. Intervention: Treatment was given with an Nd:YAG laser and a feedback system for temperature regulation. Light was delivered into the centre of the turnout and the feedback thermistor probe was placed 3 mm from the tumour margin. Rats were treated at steady-state temperatures at the feedback thermistor of 43, 46, or 50°C for 30 minutes, and at a steady-state temperature of 46°C at the feedback thermistor also for 10 and 20 minutes. Main outcome... (More)

Objective: To examine the effect of different temperatures and exposure times in interstitial laser thermotherapy. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Material: 48 male Wistar FU rats with dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma transplanted into the liver. Intervention: Treatment was given with an Nd:YAG laser and a feedback system for temperature regulation. Light was delivered into the centre of the turnout and the feedback thermistor probe was placed 3 mm from the tumour margin. Rats were treated at steady-state temperatures at the feedback thermistor of 43, 46, or 50°C for 30 minutes, and at a steady-state temperature of 46°C at the feedback thermistor also for 10 and 20 minutes. Main outcome measurement: Tumour control as assessed 6 days after treatment using light microscopical examination including immunohistochemical determination of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA as a measure of cell viability. Results: Complete tumour necrosis was achieved in all rats treated for 30 minutes, in 6/8 rats treated for 10 minutes and in 6/8 rats treated for 20 minutes at 46°C. During steady-state thermotherapy, temperatures at the tumour margin were about 11°higher than at the feedback thermistor (range 54-61°C). The surrounding liver tissue also became necrotic so that the total necrosis volume exceeded the pretreatment tumour volume. Conclusion: Interstitial laser thermotherapy at temperatures ranging from 54-61°C at the tumour margin ensures total necrosis of a transplanted rat liver carcinoma provided that treatment is given for 30 minutes.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Feedback control, Hyperthermia, Interstitial, Laser, Light penetration, Neoplasm
in
European Journal of Surgery
volume
163
issue
11
pages
10 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0030716799
  • pmid:9414047
ISSN
1102-4151
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9791da50-c57d-4672-8641-2f01b57c6926
date added to LUP
2019-06-15 17:01:03
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:01:41
@article{9791da50-c57d-4672-8641-2f01b57c6926,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To examine the effect of different temperatures and exposure times in interstitial laser thermotherapy. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Material: 48 male Wistar FU rats with dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma transplanted into the liver. Intervention: Treatment was given with an Nd:YAG laser and a feedback system for temperature regulation. Light was delivered into the centre of the turnout and the feedback thermistor probe was placed 3 mm from the tumour margin. Rats were treated at steady-state temperatures at the feedback thermistor of 43, 46, or 50°C for 30 minutes, and at a steady-state temperature of 46°C at the feedback thermistor also for 10 and 20 minutes. Main outcome measurement: Tumour control as assessed 6 days after treatment using light microscopical examination including immunohistochemical determination of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA as a measure of cell viability. Results: Complete tumour necrosis was achieved in all rats treated for 30 minutes, in 6/8 rats treated for 10 minutes and in 6/8 rats treated for 20 minutes at 46°C. During steady-state thermotherapy, temperatures at the tumour margin were about 11°higher than at the feedback thermistor (range 54-61°C). The surrounding liver tissue also became necrotic so that the total necrosis volume exceeded the pretreatment tumour volume. Conclusion: Interstitial laser thermotherapy at temperatures ranging from 54-61°C at the tumour margin ensures total necrosis of a transplanted rat liver carcinoma provided that treatment is given for 30 minutes.</p>},
  author       = {Möller, Páll H. and Ivarsson, Kjell and Stenram, Unne and Radnell, Monica and Tranberg, Karl Göran},
  issn         = {1102-4151},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {861--870},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Interstitial laser thermotherapy of adenocarcinoma transplanted into rat liver},
  volume       = {163},
  year         = {1997},
}