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Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations

Durante, Federica; Fiske, Susan T; Gelfand, Michele; Crippa, Franca; Suttora, Chiara; Stillwell, Amelia; Asbrock, Frank; Aycan, Zeynep; Bye, Hege H and Carlsson, Rickard, et al. (2017) In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(4). p.669-674
Abstract (Swedish)
A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent
warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan)
may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing
friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may
need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared
national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with
intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more
complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index
to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between
ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and... (More)
A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent
warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan)
may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing
friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may
need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared
national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with
intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more
complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index
to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between
ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype
ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflict
present higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear
inequality-ambivalence relationship. (Less)
Abstract
A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries... (More)
A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflict
present higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear inequality-ambivalence relationship. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stereotypes, peace, conflict, inequality, ambivalence
in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
volume
114
issue
4
pages
669 - 674
publisher
National Acad Sciences
external identifiers
  • scopus:85010928377
  • wos:000392597000038
ISSN
1091-6490
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1611874114
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9a2d7976-dc12-488a-84f1-20589a4c4d11
date added to LUP
2016-12-22 15:00:01
date last changed
2018-04-22 04:25:00
@article{9a2d7976-dc12-488a-84f1-20589a4c4d11,
  abstract     = {A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflict<br/>present higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear inequality-ambivalence relationship.},
  author       = {Durante, Federica and Fiske, Susan T and Gelfand, Michele and Crippa, Franca and Suttora, Chiara and Stillwell, Amelia and Asbrock, Frank and Aycan, Zeynep and Bye, Hege H and Carlsson, Rickard and Björklund, Fredrik and Daghir, Munqith and Geller, Armando and Larsen, Christian Albrekt and Latif, Hamid and Mähönen, Tuuli Anna and Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga and Teymoori, Ali},
  issn         = {1091-6490},
  keyword      = {stereotypes,peace,conflict,inequality,ambivalence},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {669--674},
  publisher    = {National Acad Sciences},
  series       = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  title        = {Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611874114},
  volume       = {114},
  year         = {2017},
}