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Relationships between global operations networks and product architectures

Pashaei, Sebastian LU (2017)
Abstract (Swedish)
Globalization has resulted in more segments and product configurations to meet the needs of various customers in different markets. For manufacturers to keep up, the operations footprint has become more global to source from
the most appropriate suppliers but also have manufacturing sites in close proximity to the main local markets. The relationship between the products offered, in particular the product design and the global operations network, is important to consider because it can be a significant source of complexity and cost in the operations network. In research and practice, the complex relationship between products, in particular, product architectures and global operations networks, has been of great interest. Product... (More)
Globalization has resulted in more segments and product configurations to meet the needs of various customers in different markets. For manufacturers to keep up, the operations footprint has become more global to source from
the most appropriate suppliers but also have manufacturing sites in close proximity to the main local markets. The relationship between the products offered, in particular the product design and the global operations network, is important to consider because it can be a significant source of complexity and cost in the operations network. In research and practice, the complex relationship between products, in particular, product architectures and global operations networks, has been of great interest. Product architectures are generally discussed in terms of modular and integral products, while the global operations network includes the firm’s own component and assembly plants, distribution system, transportation and R&D within the network, as well as first-tier key suppliers and markets. The relationship between global operations networks and product architecture is complex and needs more detail and nuance. Therefore, researchers have called for more research on the relationship between global operations networks and product architectures. The overall purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to the understanding of the relationships between global operations networks and product architectures. The research purpose is addressed by three research objectives and six appended research papers. The first research objective is to review the literature on the relationship between product architectures and global operations networks and propose new areas for research. The second research objective is to identify aspects of global operations networks that are associated with product architecture decisions. The final research objective is to test and describe the mutual relationships between product architectures and global operations networks. The empirical data collected for this dissertation is based on two distinct methodologies—multiple-case and survey studies. The multiple-case studies were conducted with three manufacturing firms with global sales and a manufacturing footprint. The participants in the multiple-case
studies were from supply chain and operations functions, and product development and R&D functions. The survey was sent to 409 plants and included general information about the companies, as well as specific information on the product and operations network. This research contributes several insights into the relationships between global operations networks and product architectures. First, this research increases the understanding of which global operations network aspects are associated with product architecture decisions, providing two novel aspects: the number of capable plants and the number of key supplier sites. Second, this research contributes with the knowledge that global operations networks from a product architecture perspective have four dimensions. Finally, the relationship between global operations networks and product architectures is not always straightforward, and
different combinations of this relationship exist for specific reasons—whether it is the product, network, markets or suppliers. The research contribution aims to improve the understanding of this relationship and provide a foundation
for future research and guidance for decision makers. (Less)
Abstract
Globalization has resulted in more segments and product configurations to meet the needs of various customers in
different markets. For manufacturers to keep up, the operations footprint has become more global to source from
the most appropriate suppliers but also have manufacturing sites in close proximity to the main local markets. The
relationship between the products offered, in particular the product design and the global operations network, is
important to consider because it can be a significant source of complexity and cost in the operations network. In
research and practice, the complex relationship between products, in particular, product architectures and global
operations networks, has been of great... (More)
Globalization has resulted in more segments and product configurations to meet the needs of various customers in
different markets. For manufacturers to keep up, the operations footprint has become more global to source from
the most appropriate suppliers but also have manufacturing sites in close proximity to the main local markets. The
relationship between the products offered, in particular the product design and the global operations network, is
important to consider because it can be a significant source of complexity and cost in the operations network. In
research and practice, the complex relationship between products, in particular, product architectures and global
operations networks, has been of great interest. Product architectures are generally discussed in terms of modular
and integral products, while the global operations network includes the firm’s own component and assembly plants,
distribution system, transportation and R&D within the network, as well as first-tier key suppliers and markets. The
relationship between global operations networks and product architecture is complex and needs more detail and
nuance. Therefore, researchers have called for more research on the relationship between global operations
networks and product architectures. The overall purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to the understanding of
the relationships between global operations networks and product architectures. The research purpose is addressed
by three research objectives and six appended research papers. The first research objective is to review the
literature on the relationship between product architectures and global operations networks and propose new areas
for research. The second research objective is to identify aspects of global operations networks that are associated
with product architecture decisions. The final research objective is to test and describe the mutual relationships
between product architectures and global operations networks. The empirical data collected for this dissertation is
based on two distinct methodologies—multiple-case and survey studies. The multiple-case studies were conducted
with three manufacturing firms with global sales and a manufacturing footprint. The participants in the multiple-case
studies were from supply chain and operations functions, and product development and R&D functions. The survey
was sent to 409 plants and included general information about the companies, as well as specific information on the
product and operations network. This research contributes several insights into the relationships between global
operations networks and product architectures. First, this research increases the understanding of which global
operations network aspects are associated with product architecture decisions, providing two novel aspects: the
number of capable plants and the number of key supplier sites. Second, this research contributes with the knowledge
that global operations networks from a product architecture perspective have four dimensions. Finally, the
relationship between global operations networks and product architectures is not always straightforward, and
different combinations of this relationship exist for specific reasons—whether it is the product, network, markets or
suppliers. The research contribution aims to improve the understanding of this relationship and provide a foundation
for future research and guidance for decision makers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Professor Hsuan, Juliana, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Supply chain, Integral, Modular, Multiple-case study, survey
pages
245 pages
publisher
Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Management and Logistics
defense location
M:B, M-building, Ole Römers väg 1, Lund University, Faculty of Engineering.
defense date
2017-05-05 10:00
ISBN
978-91-7753-197-5
978-91-7753-196-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ada9192-fecc-4905-add4-ae88ab2141a4
date added to LUP
2017-04-07 08:51:31
date last changed
2017-06-26 09:56:57
@phdthesis{9ada9192-fecc-4905-add4-ae88ab2141a4,
  abstract     = {Globalization has resulted in more segments and product configurations to meet the needs of various customers in<br>
different markets. For manufacturers to keep up, the operations footprint has become more global to source from<br>
the most appropriate suppliers but also have manufacturing sites in close proximity to the main local markets. The<br>
relationship between the products offered, in particular the product design and the global operations network, is<br>
important to consider because it can be a significant source of complexity and cost in the operations network. In<br>
research and practice, the complex relationship between products, in particular, product architectures and global<br>
operations networks, has been of great interest. Product architectures are generally discussed in terms of modular<br>
and integral products, while the global operations network includes the firm’s own component and assembly plants,<br>
distribution system, transportation and R&amp;D within the network, as well as first-tier key suppliers and markets. The<br>
relationship between global operations networks and product architecture is complex and needs more detail and<br>
nuance. Therefore, researchers have called for more research on the relationship between global operations<br>
networks and product architectures. The overall purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to the understanding of<br>
the relationships between global operations networks and product architectures. The research purpose is addressed<br>
by three research objectives and six appended research papers. The first research objective is to review the<br>
literature on the relationship between product architectures and global operations networks and propose new areas<br>
for research. The second research objective is to identify aspects of global operations networks that are associated<br>
with product architecture decisions. The final research objective is to test and describe the mutual relationships<br>
between product architectures and global operations networks. The empirical data collected for this dissertation is<br>
based on two distinct methodologies—multiple-case and survey studies. The multiple-case studies were conducted<br>
with three manufacturing firms with global sales and a manufacturing footprint. The participants in the multiple-case<br>
studies were from supply chain and operations functions, and product development and R&amp;D functions. The survey<br>
was sent to 409 plants and included general information about the companies, as well as specific information on the<br>
product and operations network. This research contributes several insights into the relationships between global<br>
operations networks and product architectures. First, this research increases the understanding of which global<br>
operations network aspects are associated with product architecture decisions, providing two novel aspects: the<br>
number of capable plants and the number of key supplier sites. Second, this research contributes with the knowledge<br>
that global operations networks from a product architecture perspective have four dimensions. Finally, the<br>
relationship between global operations networks and product architectures is not always straightforward, and<br>
different combinations of this relationship exist for specific reasons—whether it is the product, network, markets or<br>
suppliers. The research contribution aims to improve the understanding of this relationship and provide a foundation<br>
for future research and guidance for decision makers.},
  author       = {Pashaei, Sebastian},
  isbn         = {978-91-7753-197-5},
  keyword      = {Supply chain, Integral, Modular, Multiple-case study, survey},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  pages        = {245},
  publisher    = {Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Management and Logistics},
  school       = {Lund University},
  title        = {Relationships between global operations networks and product architectures},
  year         = {2017},
}