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Scale-down failed – Dissimilarities between high-pressure homogenizers of different scales due to failed mechanistic matching

Håkansson, Andreas LU (2017) In Journal of Food Engineering 195. p.31-39
Abstract

The high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) is used extensively in the processing of non-solid foods. Food researchers and producers use HPHs of different scales, from laboratory-scale (∼10 L/h) to the largest production-scale machines (∼50 000 L/h). Hence, the process design and interpretation of academic findings regarding industrial condition requires an understanding of differences between scales. This contribution uses theoretical calculations to compare the hydrodynamics of the different scales and interpret differences in the mechanism of drop-breakup. Results indicate substantial differences between HPHs of different scales. The laboratory-scale HPH operates in the laminar regime whereas the production-scale is in the fully turbulent... (More)

The high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) is used extensively in the processing of non-solid foods. Food researchers and producers use HPHs of different scales, from laboratory-scale (∼10 L/h) to the largest production-scale machines (∼50 000 L/h). Hence, the process design and interpretation of academic findings regarding industrial condition requires an understanding of differences between scales. This contribution uses theoretical calculations to compare the hydrodynamics of the different scales and interpret differences in the mechanism of drop-breakup. Results indicate substantial differences between HPHs of different scales. The laboratory-scale HPH operates in the laminar regime whereas the production-scale is in the fully turbulent regime. The smaller scale machines are also less prone to cavitation and differ in their pressure profiles. This suggest that the HPHs of different scales should be seen as principally different emulsification processes. Conclusions on the effect or functionality of a HPH can therefore not readily be translate between scales.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Emulsification, Fluid dynamics, Fragmentation, High-pressure homogenization, Scale-up
in
Journal of Food Engineering
volume
195
pages
9 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84989311635
ISSN
0260-8774
DOI
10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2016.09.019
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
9d2f70eb-b257-42a7-861d-ec08d63d39b5
date added to LUP
2019-03-11 13:03:46
date last changed
2020-09-16 04:11:47
@article{9d2f70eb-b257-42a7-861d-ec08d63d39b5,
  abstract     = {<p>The high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) is used extensively in the processing of non-solid foods. Food researchers and producers use HPHs of different scales, from laboratory-scale (∼10 L/h) to the largest production-scale machines (∼50 000 L/h). Hence, the process design and interpretation of academic findings regarding industrial condition requires an understanding of differences between scales. This contribution uses theoretical calculations to compare the hydrodynamics of the different scales and interpret differences in the mechanism of drop-breakup. Results indicate substantial differences between HPHs of different scales. The laboratory-scale HPH operates in the laminar regime whereas the production-scale is in the fully turbulent regime. The smaller scale machines are also less prone to cavitation and differ in their pressure profiles. This suggest that the HPHs of different scales should be seen as principally different emulsification processes. Conclusions on the effect or functionality of a HPH can therefore not readily be translate between scales.</p>},
  author       = {Håkansson, Andreas},
  issn         = {0260-8774},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {31--39},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Food Engineering},
  title        = {Scale-down failed – Dissimilarities between high-pressure homogenizers of different scales due to failed mechanistic matching},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2016.09.019},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2016.09.019},
  volume       = {195},
  year         = {2017},
}