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Heightened among-individual variation in life history but not morphology is related to developmental temperature in reptiles

Noble, Daniel W.A. LU ; Senior, Alistair M. ; Uller, Tobias LU and Schwanz, Lisa E. (2021) In Journal of evolutionary biology 34(11). p.1793-1802
Abstract

Increases in phenotypic variation under extreme (e.g. novel or stressful) environmental conditions are emerging as a crucial process through which evolutionary adaptation can occur. Lack of prior stabilizing selection, as well as potential instability of developmental processes in these environments, may lead to a release of phenotypic variation that can have important evolutionary consequences. Although such patterns have been shown in model study organisms, we know little about the generality of trait variance across environments for non-model organisms. Here, we test whether extreme developmental temperatures increase the phenotypic variation across diverse reptile taxa. We find that the among-individual variation in a key... (More)

Increases in phenotypic variation under extreme (e.g. novel or stressful) environmental conditions are emerging as a crucial process through which evolutionary adaptation can occur. Lack of prior stabilizing selection, as well as potential instability of developmental processes in these environments, may lead to a release of phenotypic variation that can have important evolutionary consequences. Although such patterns have been shown in model study organisms, we know little about the generality of trait variance across environments for non-model organisms. Here, we test whether extreme developmental temperatures increase the phenotypic variation across diverse reptile taxa. We find that the among-individual variation in a key life-history trait (post-hatching growth) increases at extreme cold and hot temperatures. However, variations in two measures of hatchling morphology and in hatchling performance were not related to developmental temperature. Although extreme developmental temperatures may increase the variation in growth, our results suggest that plastic responses to stressful incubation conditions do not generally make more extreme phenotypes available to selection. We discuss the reasons for the general lack of increased variability at extreme incubation temperatures and the implications this has for local adaptation in hatchling morphology and physiology.

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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
developmental stress, life history evolution, meta-analysis, phenotypic plasticity, reptiles
in
Journal of evolutionary biology
volume
34
issue
11
pages
10 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85116734969
  • pmid:34543488
ISSN
1010-061X
DOI
10.1111/jeb.13938
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Publisher Copyright: © 2021 European Society for Evolutionary Biology
id
9da7ef40-7516-48c8-a1b5-a0eae13f2d94
date added to LUP
2021-10-27 13:47:36
date last changed
2022-11-08 05:16:32
@article{9da7ef40-7516-48c8-a1b5-a0eae13f2d94,
  abstract     = {{<p>Increases in phenotypic variation under extreme (e.g. novel or stressful) environmental conditions are emerging as a crucial process through which evolutionary adaptation can occur. Lack of prior stabilizing selection, as well as potential instability of developmental processes in these environments, may lead to a release of phenotypic variation that can have important evolutionary consequences. Although such patterns have been shown in model study organisms, we know little about the generality of trait variance across environments for non-model organisms. Here, we test whether extreme developmental temperatures increase the phenotypic variation across diverse reptile taxa. We find that the among-individual variation in a key life-history trait (post-hatching growth) increases at extreme cold and hot temperatures. However, variations in two measures of hatchling morphology and in hatchling performance were not related to developmental temperature. Although extreme developmental temperatures may increase the variation in growth, our results suggest that plastic responses to stressful incubation conditions do not generally make more extreme phenotypes available to selection. We discuss the reasons for the general lack of increased variability at extreme incubation temperatures and the implications this has for local adaptation in hatchling morphology and physiology.</p>}},
  author       = {{Noble, Daniel W.A. and Senior, Alistair M. and Uller, Tobias and Schwanz, Lisa E.}},
  issn         = {{1010-061X}},
  keywords     = {{developmental stress; life history evolution; meta-analysis; phenotypic plasticity; reptiles}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{11}},
  number       = {{11}},
  pages        = {{1793--1802}},
  publisher    = {{John Wiley & Sons Inc.}},
  series       = {{Journal of evolutionary biology}},
  title        = {{Heightened among-individual variation in life history but not morphology is related to developmental temperature in reptiles}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13938}},
  doi          = {{10.1111/jeb.13938}},
  volume       = {{34}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}