Advanced

Why Engage in Collective Action? The Conditional Effect of Social Support and Efficacy on Protest Participation

Bäck, Emma A. LU ; Bäck, Hanna LU and Sivén, David LU (2018) In Basic and Applied Social Psychology 40(1). p.49-59
Abstract

Why do people engage in collective actions, such as demonstrations? We suggest that intentions to engage in protest activities come from the perception that the action is an efficient way to affect policy but is also dependent upon the level of others’ engagement. Specifically, lower support should spur intentions to engage if the individual believes that the collective act is an efficient means to bring about social change. In two experiments, manipulating social support, efficacy increased intentions to participate in collective actions but mainly for participants with low social support (Experiments 1 and 2). In Experiment 3, manipulating efficacy, high social support was related to decreased intentions to engage. However, in this... (More)

Why do people engage in collective actions, such as demonstrations? We suggest that intentions to engage in protest activities come from the perception that the action is an efficient way to affect policy but is also dependent upon the level of others’ engagement. Specifically, lower support should spur intentions to engage if the individual believes that the collective act is an efficient means to bring about social change. In two experiments, manipulating social support, efficacy increased intentions to participate in collective actions but mainly for participants with low social support (Experiments 1 and 2). In Experiment 3, manipulating efficacy, high social support was related to decreased intentions to engage. However, in this study, social support did not interact with efficacy.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Basic and Applied Social Psychology
volume
40
issue
1
pages
11 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85041280631
ISSN
0197-3533
DOI
10.1080/01973533.2017.1422128
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a3d23b0d-82dd-43c4-bb5b-b324eea8f482
date added to LUP
2018-02-12 12:00:34
date last changed
2018-02-12 12:00:34
@article{a3d23b0d-82dd-43c4-bb5b-b324eea8f482,
  abstract     = {<p>Why do people engage in collective actions, such as demonstrations? We suggest that intentions to engage in protest activities come from the perception that the action is an efficient way to affect policy but is also dependent upon the level of others’ engagement. Specifically, lower support should spur intentions to engage if the individual believes that the collective act is an efficient means to bring about social change. In two experiments, manipulating social support, efficacy increased intentions to participate in collective actions but mainly for participants with low social support (Experiments 1 and 2). In Experiment 3, manipulating efficacy, high social support was related to decreased intentions to engage. However, in this study, social support did not interact with efficacy.</p>},
  author       = {Bäck, Emma A. and Bäck, Hanna and Sivén, David},
  issn         = {0197-3533},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {49--59},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Basic and Applied Social Psychology},
  title        = {Why Engage in Collective Action? The Conditional Effect of Social Support and Efficacy on Protest Participation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01973533.2017.1422128},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2018},
}