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Vision and the light environment.

Warrant, Eric LU and Johnsen, Sönke (2013) In Current Biology 23(22). p.990-994
Abstract
Almost all animals, no matter how humble, possess eyes. Only those that live in total darkness, such as in a pitch-dark cave, may lack eyes entirely. Even at tremendous depths in the ocean - where the only lights that are ever seen are rare and fitful sparks of bioluminescence - most animals have eyes, and often surprisingly well-developed eyes. And despite their diversity (there are currently ten generally recognised optical types) all eyes have evolved in response to the remarkably varied light environments that are present in the habitats where animals live. Variations in the intensity of light, as well as in its direction, colour and dominant planes of polarisation, have all had dramatic effects on visual evolution. In the terrestrial... (More)
Almost all animals, no matter how humble, possess eyes. Only those that live in total darkness, such as in a pitch-dark cave, may lack eyes entirely. Even at tremendous depths in the ocean - where the only lights that are ever seen are rare and fitful sparks of bioluminescence - most animals have eyes, and often surprisingly well-developed eyes. And despite their diversity (there are currently ten generally recognised optical types) all eyes have evolved in response to the remarkably varied light environments that are present in the habitats where animals live. Variations in the intensity of light, as well as in its direction, colour and dominant planes of polarisation, have all had dramatic effects on visual evolution. In the terrestrial habitats where we ourselves have most recently evolved, the light environment can vary quite markedly from day to night and from one location to another. In aquatic habitats, this variation can be orders of magnitude greater. Even though the ecologies and life histories of animals have played a major role in visual evolution, it is arguably the physical limitations imposed on photodetection by a given habitat and its light environment that have defined the basic selective pressures that have driven the evolution of eyes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Current Biology
volume
23
issue
22
pages
990 - 994
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000327417000005
  • pmid:24262832
  • scopus:84889072350
ISSN
1879-0445
DOI
10.1016/j.cub.2013.10.019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7bbbb85-2312-4bbe-9002-08f7c207f676 (old id 4179005)
date added to LUP
2013-12-18 13:22:51
date last changed
2019-08-28 01:04:07
@misc{a7bbbb85-2312-4bbe-9002-08f7c207f676,
  abstract     = {Almost all animals, no matter how humble, possess eyes. Only those that live in total darkness, such as in a pitch-dark cave, may lack eyes entirely. Even at tremendous depths in the ocean - where the only lights that are ever seen are rare and fitful sparks of bioluminescence - most animals have eyes, and often surprisingly well-developed eyes. And despite their diversity (there are currently ten generally recognised optical types) all eyes have evolved in response to the remarkably varied light environments that are present in the habitats where animals live. Variations in the intensity of light, as well as in its direction, colour and dominant planes of polarisation, have all had dramatic effects on visual evolution. In the terrestrial habitats where we ourselves have most recently evolved, the light environment can vary quite markedly from day to night and from one location to another. In aquatic habitats, this variation can be orders of magnitude greater. Even though the ecologies and life histories of animals have played a major role in visual evolution, it is arguably the physical limitations imposed on photodetection by a given habitat and its light environment that have defined the basic selective pressures that have driven the evolution of eyes.},
  author       = {Warrant, Eric and Johnsen, Sönke},
  issn         = {1879-0445},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {22},
  pages        = {990--994},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Current Biology},
  title        = {Vision and the light environment.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2013.10.019},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2013},
}