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Relation and technique in psychotherapy: Two partly overlapping categories.

Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU (2017) In Journal of Psychotherapy Integration 27(1). p.59-78
Abstract (Swedish)
The terms relation and technique are frequently used in discussions of what is effective in psychotherapy, but often on the assumption that they refer to conceptually separate phenomena. The present article questions this dichotomy between relationship and technique. This is done on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the concepts of technique and relationship, and the variety of phenomena they refer to. Techniques are defined as procedures prescribed as the means to reach some goal, that are made available to individuals through various kinds of training, education, and apprenticeship, and that result in the acquisition of skills and attitudes. It is argued that there are 2 basic categories of techniques in psychotherapy: (a)... (More)
The terms relation and technique are frequently used in discussions of what is effective in psychotherapy, but often on the assumption that they refer to conceptually separate phenomena. The present article questions this dichotomy between relationship and technique. This is done on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the concepts of technique and relationship, and the variety of phenomena they refer to. Techniques are defined as procedures prescribed as the means to reach some goal, that are made available to individuals through various kinds of training, education, and apprenticeship, and that result in the acquisition of skills and attitudes. It is argued that there are 2 basic categories of techniques in psychotherapy: (a) relational techniques, which the therapist uses either explicitly or implicitly in the interaction with the patient, and (b)
self-techniques, which the therapist teaches the patient to use (or applies to him/herself). In addition, it is argued that the therapeutic relationship involves a number of nontechnical aspects that need to be systematically addressed. This model of technique and relationship as partly overlapping categories is illustrated with examples from psychodynamic therapy, cognitive– behavioral therapies and humanistic-experiential therapy. It is argued that the development of a comprehensive theory of psychotherapy would benefit from a systematic search through the literature to identify techniques that have been advocated by various therapists, and the use of thematic analysis to analyze the content of these techniques in terms of skills and attitudes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Psychotherapy Integration
volume
27
issue
1
pages
59 - 78
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009787067
DOI
10.1037/int0000068
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a9bf2678-b6ee-4e01-9c36-3c69be7d5418
date added to LUP
2017-03-15 20:51:36
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:55:34
@article{a9bf2678-b6ee-4e01-9c36-3c69be7d5418,
  abstract     = {The terms relation and technique are frequently used in discussions of what is effective in psychotherapy, but often on the assumption that they refer to conceptually separate phenomena. The present article questions this dichotomy between relationship and technique. This is done on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the concepts of technique and relationship, and the variety of phenomena they refer to. Techniques are defined as procedures prescribed as the means to reach some goal, that are made available to individuals through various kinds of training, education, and apprenticeship, and that result in the acquisition of skills and attitudes. It is argued that there are 2 basic categories of techniques in psychotherapy: (a) relational techniques, which the therapist uses either explicitly or implicitly in the interaction with the patient, and (b)<br/>self-techniques, which the therapist teaches the patient to use (or applies to him/herself). In addition, it is argued that the therapeutic relationship involves a number of nontechnical aspects that need to be systematically addressed. This model of technique and relationship as partly overlapping categories is illustrated with examples from psychodynamic therapy, cognitive– behavioral therapies and humanistic-experiential therapy. It is argued that the development of a comprehensive theory of psychotherapy would benefit from a systematic search through the literature to identify techniques that have been advocated by various therapists, and the use of thematic analysis to analyze the content of these techniques in terms of skills and attitudes.},
  author       = {Lundh, Lars-Gunnar},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {59--78},
  series       = {Journal of Psychotherapy Integration},
  title        = {Relation and technique in psychotherapy: Two partly overlapping categories.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/int0000068},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2017},
}