Advanced

Atypical sensory processing pattern following median or ulnar nerve injury - A case-control study

Vikström, Pernilla LU ; Björkman, Anders LU ; Carlsson, Ingela K. LU ; Olsson, Anna Karin and Rosén, Birgitta LU (2018) In BMC Neurology 18(1).
Abstract

Background: Due to brain plasticity a transection of a median or ulnar nerve results in profound changes in the somatosensory areas in the brain. The permanent sensory deprivation after a peripheral nerve injury might influence the interaction between all senses. The aim of the study was to investigate if a median and/or ulnar nerve injury gives rise to a changed sensory processing pattern. In addition we examined if age at injury, injured nerve or time since injury influence the sensory processing pattern. Methods: Fifty patients (40 men and 10 women, median age 43) operated due to a median and/or ulnar nerve injury were included. The patients completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile questionnaire, which includes a comprehensive... (More)

Background: Due to brain plasticity a transection of a median or ulnar nerve results in profound changes in the somatosensory areas in the brain. The permanent sensory deprivation after a peripheral nerve injury might influence the interaction between all senses. The aim of the study was to investigate if a median and/or ulnar nerve injury gives rise to a changed sensory processing pattern. In addition we examined if age at injury, injured nerve or time since injury influence the sensory processing pattern. Methods: Fifty patients (40 men and 10 women, median age 43) operated due to a median and/or ulnar nerve injury were included. The patients completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile questionnaire, which includes a comprehensive characterization on how sensory information is processed and how an individual responds to multiple sensory modalities. AASP categorizes the results into four possible Quadrants of behavioral profiles (Q1-low registration, Q2-sensory seeking, Q3-sensory sensitivity and Q4-sensory avoiding). The results were compared to 209 healthy age and gender matched controls. Anova Matched Design was used for evaluation of differences between the patient group and the control group. Atypical sensory processing behavior was determined in relation to the normative distribution of the control group. Results: Significant difference was seen in Q1, low registration. 40% in the patient group scored atypically in this Quadrant compared to 16% of the controls. No correlation between atypical sensory processing pattern and age or time since injury was seen. Conclusion: A peripheral nerve injury entails altered sensory processing pattern with increased proportion of patients with low registration to sensory stimulus overall. Our results can guide us into more client centered rehabilitation strategies.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Injury, Median nerve, Sensory, Sensory profile, Ulnar nerve
in
BMC Neurology
volume
18
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85053669061
ISSN
1471-2377
DOI
10.1186/s12883-018-1152-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa13de4e-ba28-415f-b2fb-8575c69de214
date added to LUP
2018-10-11 07:27:47
date last changed
2019-01-06 14:09:31
@article{aa13de4e-ba28-415f-b2fb-8575c69de214,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Due to brain plasticity a transection of a median or ulnar nerve results in profound changes in the somatosensory areas in the brain. The permanent sensory deprivation after a peripheral nerve injury might influence the interaction between all senses. The aim of the study was to investigate if a median and/or ulnar nerve injury gives rise to a changed sensory processing pattern. In addition we examined if age at injury, injured nerve or time since injury influence the sensory processing pattern. Methods: Fifty patients (40 men and 10 women, median age 43) operated due to a median and/or ulnar nerve injury were included. The patients completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile questionnaire, which includes a comprehensive characterization on how sensory information is processed and how an individual responds to multiple sensory modalities. AASP categorizes the results into four possible Quadrants of behavioral profiles (Q1-low registration, Q2-sensory seeking, Q3-sensory sensitivity and Q4-sensory avoiding). The results were compared to 209 healthy age and gender matched controls. Anova Matched Design was used for evaluation of differences between the patient group and the control group. Atypical sensory processing behavior was determined in relation to the normative distribution of the control group. Results: Significant difference was seen in Q1, low registration. 40% in the patient group scored atypically in this Quadrant compared to 16% of the controls. No correlation between atypical sensory processing pattern and age or time since injury was seen. Conclusion: A peripheral nerve injury entails altered sensory processing pattern with increased proportion of patients with low registration to sensory stimulus overall. Our results can guide us into more client centered rehabilitation strategies.</p>},
  articleno    = {146},
  author       = {Vikström, Pernilla and Björkman, Anders and Carlsson, Ingela K. and Olsson, Anna Karin and Rosén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1471-2377},
  keyword      = {Injury,Median nerve,Sensory,Sensory profile,Ulnar nerve},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Neurology},
  title        = {Atypical sensory processing pattern following median or ulnar nerve injury - A case-control study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-018-1152-y},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2018},
}