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Memory in relation to depth of sedation in adult mechanically ventilated intensive care patients.

Samuelson, Karin LU ; Lundberg, Dag LU and Fridlund, Bengt LU (2006) In Intensive Care Medicine 32(5). p.660-667
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the relationship between memory and intensive care sedation. Design and setting: Prospective cohort study over 18 months in two general intensive care units (ICUs) in district university hospitals. Patients: 313 intubated mechanically ventilated adults admitted for more than 24 h, 250 of whom completed the study. Measurements: Patients (n = 250) were interviewed in the ward 5 days after discharge from the ICU using the ICU Memory Tool. Patient characteristics, doses of sedative and analgesic agents, and sedation scores as measured by the Motor Activity Assessment Scale (MAAS) were collected from hospital records after the interview. Results: Patients with no recall (18%) were significantly older, had higher... (More)
Objective: To investigate the relationship between memory and intensive care sedation. Design and setting: Prospective cohort study over 18 months in two general intensive care units (ICUs) in district university hospitals. Patients: 313 intubated mechanically ventilated adults admitted for more than 24 h, 250 of whom completed the study. Measurements: Patients (n = 250) were interviewed in the ward 5 days after discharge from the ICU using the ICU Memory Tool. Patient characteristics, doses of sedative and analgesic agents, and sedation scores as measured by the Motor Activity Assessment Scale (MAAS) were collected from hospital records after the interview. Results: Patients with no recall (18%) were significantly older, had higher baseline severity of illness, and experienced fewer periods of wakefulness (median proportion of MAAS score 3; 0.37 vs. 0.70) than those who had memories of the ICU (82%). Multivariate analyses showed that increasing proportion of MAAS 0-2 and older age were significantly associated with having no recall. Patients with delusional memories (34%) had significantly longer ICU stay (median 6.6 vs. 2.2 days), higher baseline severity of illness, higher proportions of MAAS scores 4-6, and more administration of midazolam than those with recall of the ICU without delusional memories. Conclusions: Heavy sedation increases the risk of having no recall, and longer ICU stay increases the risk of delusional memories. The depth of sedation during total ICU stay as recorded with the MAAS may predict the probability of having memories of the ICU. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
delusions, recall, sedation, intensive care unit, nursing, mechanical ventilation
in
Intensive Care Medicine
volume
32
issue
5
pages
660 - 667
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000237090300005
  • scopus:33646425079
  • pmid:16520999
ISSN
0342-4642
DOI
10.1007/s00134-006-0105-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (013230022), Division of Nursing (Closed 2012) (013065000)
id
ab93d067-d089-4a4e-8e9b-ac4d081b45ff (old id 154787)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16520999&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:43:26
date last changed
2019-12-04 02:11:38
@article{ab93d067-d089-4a4e-8e9b-ac4d081b45ff,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate the relationship between memory and intensive care sedation. Design and setting: Prospective cohort study over 18 months in two general intensive care units (ICUs) in district university hospitals. Patients: 313 intubated mechanically ventilated adults admitted for more than 24 h, 250 of whom completed the study. Measurements: Patients (n = 250) were interviewed in the ward 5 days after discharge from the ICU using the ICU Memory Tool. Patient characteristics, doses of sedative and analgesic agents, and sedation scores as measured by the Motor Activity Assessment Scale (MAAS) were collected from hospital records after the interview. Results: Patients with no recall (18%) were significantly older, had higher baseline severity of illness, and experienced fewer periods of wakefulness (median proportion of MAAS score 3; 0.37 vs. 0.70) than those who had memories of the ICU (82%). Multivariate analyses showed that increasing proportion of MAAS 0-2 and older age were significantly associated with having no recall. Patients with delusional memories (34%) had significantly longer ICU stay (median 6.6 vs. 2.2 days), higher baseline severity of illness, higher proportions of MAAS scores 4-6, and more administration of midazolam than those with recall of the ICU without delusional memories. Conclusions: Heavy sedation increases the risk of having no recall, and longer ICU stay increases the risk of delusional memories. The depth of sedation during total ICU stay as recorded with the MAAS may predict the probability of having memories of the ICU.},
  author       = {Samuelson, Karin and Lundberg, Dag and Fridlund, Bengt},
  issn         = {0342-4642},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {660--667},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Intensive Care Medicine},
  title        = {Memory in relation to depth of sedation in adult mechanically ventilated intensive care patients.},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/2612027/625375.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1007/s00134-006-0105-x},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2006},
}