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Wintering bird communities are tracking climate change faster than breeding communities

Lehikoinen, Aleksi LU ; Lindström, Åke LU ; Santangeli, Andrea ; Sirkiä, Päivi M. ; Brotons, Lluís ; Devictor, Vincent ; Elts, Jaanus ; Foppen, Ruud P.B. ; Heldbjerg, Henning and Herrando, Sergi , et al. (2021) In Journal of Animal Ecology
Abstract

Global climate change is driving species' distributions towards the poles and mountain tops during both non-breeding and breeding seasons, leading to changes in the composition of natural communities. However, the degree of season differences in climate-driven community shifts has not been thoroughly investigated at large spatial scales. We compared the rates of change in the community composition during both winter (non-breeding season) and summer (breeding) and their relation to temperature changes. Based on continental-scale data from Europe and North America, we examined changes in bird community composition using the community temperature index (CTI) approach and compared the changes with observed regional temperature changes... (More)

Global climate change is driving species' distributions towards the poles and mountain tops during both non-breeding and breeding seasons, leading to changes in the composition of natural communities. However, the degree of season differences in climate-driven community shifts has not been thoroughly investigated at large spatial scales. We compared the rates of change in the community composition during both winter (non-breeding season) and summer (breeding) and their relation to temperature changes. Based on continental-scale data from Europe and North America, we examined changes in bird community composition using the community temperature index (CTI) approach and compared the changes with observed regional temperature changes during 1980–2016. CTI increased faster in winter than in summer. This seasonal discrepancy is probably because individuals are less site-faithful in winter, and can more readily shift their wintering sites in response to weather in comparison to the breeding season. Regional long-term changes in community composition were positively associated with regional temperature changes during both seasons, but the pattern was only significant during summer due to high annual variability in winter communities. Annual changes in community composition were positively associated with the annual temperature changes during both seasons. Our results were broadly consistent across continents, suggesting some climate-driven restructuring in both European and North American avian communities. Because community composition has changed much faster during the winter than during the breeding season, it is important to increase our knowledge about climate-driven impacts during the less-studied non-breeding season.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
community composition, community ecology, environmental change, global warming, long-term monitoring, population dynamics
in
Journal of Animal Ecology
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:33496011
  • scopus:85100869386
ISSN
0021-8790
DOI
10.1111/1365-2656.13433
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
abbf5d7f-c692-41fc-88ec-064ffe6caa52
date added to LUP
2021-03-05 09:30:53
date last changed
2021-04-27 05:44:46
@article{abbf5d7f-c692-41fc-88ec-064ffe6caa52,
  abstract     = {<p>Global climate change is driving species' distributions towards the poles and mountain tops during both non-breeding and breeding seasons, leading to changes in the composition of natural communities. However, the degree of season differences in climate-driven community shifts has not been thoroughly investigated at large spatial scales. We compared the rates of change in the community composition during both winter (non-breeding season) and summer (breeding) and their relation to temperature changes. Based on continental-scale data from Europe and North America, we examined changes in bird community composition using the community temperature index (CTI) approach and compared the changes with observed regional temperature changes during 1980–2016. CTI increased faster in winter than in summer. This seasonal discrepancy is probably because individuals are less site-faithful in winter, and can more readily shift their wintering sites in response to weather in comparison to the breeding season. Regional long-term changes in community composition were positively associated with regional temperature changes during both seasons, but the pattern was only significant during summer due to high annual variability in winter communities. Annual changes in community composition were positively associated with the annual temperature changes during both seasons. Our results were broadly consistent across continents, suggesting some climate-driven restructuring in both European and North American avian communities. Because community composition has changed much faster during the winter than during the breeding season, it is important to increase our knowledge about climate-driven impacts during the less-studied non-breeding season.</p>},
  author       = {Lehikoinen, Aleksi and Lindström, Åke and Santangeli, Andrea and Sirkiä, Päivi M. and Brotons, Lluís and Devictor, Vincent and Elts, Jaanus and Foppen, Ruud P.B. and Heldbjerg, Henning and Herrando, Sergi and Herremans, Marc and Hudson, Marie Anne R. and Jiguet, Frédéric and Johnston, Alison and Lorrilliere, Romain and Marjakangas, Emma Liina and Michel, Nicole L. and Moshøj, Charlotte M. and Nellis, Renno and Paquet, Jean Yves and Smith, Adam C. and Szép, Tibor and van Turnhout, Chris},
  issn         = {0021-8790},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Animal Ecology},
  title        = {Wintering bird communities are tracking climate change faster than breeding communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13433},
  doi          = {10.1111/1365-2656.13433},
  year         = {2021},
}